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When is a Short a Short, and when is a Short NOT a Short?

A Short is just that, power shorted to ground. An example would be a wire with +12volts that the insulation has worn through and allowed the +12volts to contact ground directly. The result is normally a blown fuse, or worse a fried wire, or worst case a vehicle up in flames. Literally, a SHORT is the same as connecting a wire from the + to the - of a battery (not reccomended).

So when is a Short NOT a Short? Many intermittent electrical problems are blamed on a Short that are not real Shorts. Actually, they are OPENS. An Open is when you DO NOT have a wire between the + and - of a battery. Litterally it is a broken wire.

I'll explain: Have you ever broken the tab off of a soda/beer can? You know, bend it back and for a few times and it breaks off. The reason it breaks is because you "fatigued" the metal to a point that it breaks. Copper is also prone to fatigue break-the same copper that is in the wiring in our beloved trucks. One bad thing about wiring is that the copper conductors can fatigue and break, yet the insulation looks FINE. The wiring between the firewall and engine is most prone to this because of the engines vibrations.

So if you have checked all of the grounds, connectors, replaced suspected components and it still is bad, suspect the wiring. I can look fine, but be faulty.

Glenn
 
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