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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Chalk this up to another lift and tire question! I searched the forums and didn’t see any direct answers.

My Setup:

1989 W100 NP435 NP241

Plan on swapping in a Dana 60 Front & 14 Bolt FF Rear from a military 1984 C30 truck. 4.56s w/ Gov Lockers.

I’m planning to run Jungle Jim’s 4” drop kit front and rear with 52” Chevy springs in the front and 56” springs in the rear.

I’m wanting to run Toyo Open Country MTs 40x13.50r17 which actually measure 39.5x14.50r17.

I want to lift the truck using suspension only, no body lift and absolutely no cutting or chopping.

I’m wanting to tuck the tires under the truck as much as possible. Maybe 2” sticking out? So I can cover them with a 2” fender flare?

I’m thinking somewhere in the 8” to 10” lift range should work with 9” probably being ideal? I want to be able to hit a pothole or wheel it and not have it rub, but I also don’t want to have unnecessary lift either.

These are the wheels I was planning on running, not sure how the backspacing will play out.


Pictures for attention.
Currently on 35x12.50r15 KM2 BFG 9.25 rear D44 front.

617220
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I want to lift the truck using suspension only, no body lift and absolutely no cutting or chopping.

Might want to rethink that. The wheel openings are small on these trucks so a LOT of lift is needed. 52's and 56's are flexier too, so its easier to push the tires into the sheetmetal.

I'm at 3-4" with 35's and its tall truck already. (Its a diesel, so 2-3" headstart on a W100.) There's some good examples of grafted/stretched fenders on various forums. The front makes a bigger difference than the rear due to tire swing. (Maybe recycle some less-than perfect fenders?) Here's one:

One point with the Chevy axles is they're ~2" wider, so figure that into your wheel backspacing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Might want to rethink that. The wheel openings are small on these trucks so a LOT of lift is needed. 52's and 56's are flexier too, so its easier to push the tires into the sheetmetal.

I'm at 3-4" with 35's and its tall truck already. (Its a diesel, so 2-3" headstart on a W100.) There's some good examples of grafted/stretched fenders on various forums. The front makes a bigger difference than the rear due to tire swing. (Maybe recycle some less-than perfect fenders?) Here's one:

One point with the Chevy axles is they're ~2" wider, so figure that into your wheel backspacing.
The front Chevy Dana 60 is exactly the same as the factory Dana 44 I have now. Width, perches, everything. And the 14FF is narrower then the 60 factory on the Chevy due to tracking. I need to double check but I believe it should be the same as the 9-1/4? I don’t think width will be an issue. I’ll just have to relocate the perches in 2” on the 14 bolt. From what I found it’s the newer stuff that’s wider. These axles are from the 80s.

But you make a very good point on the suspension flex! I defiantly do not want to cut. Period. So I need to determine how much lift is required. Should I go with 10” then?
 

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with that much lift , your gonna need a t-case drop and motor mount drop with custom made oil pan OR custom made drive shafts for such a steep angle plus a "clocking ring" for the t-case, not to mention steering because the stock steering wont work at that height, gonna need custom cross over steering . there's a truck on FB with a 10 inch lift thats for sale because the kid cant drive it . the rear shaft eats u-joints up in a day and he cant even get the front shaft to bolt up / lifting something that HIGH takes more than just putting springs on and calling it good like that kid did
 

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The best advice I’ve ever heard with regards to this question is to build a suspension/drivetrain that will work and then buy tires that fit, not the other way around…but if you insist…

You will be getting into extensive fabrication and modification. You will have to move the front axle forward along with the steering box 2wd mounting point (jungle has you covered with this) get all the correct crossover steering pieces…even at that if you absolutely can’t trim the fenders then you will likely need to adjust the steering stops. Keeping the wheels on the narrow side (9-9.5”) and as much backspacing as possible will help. With crossover your tire has more room where the drag link and steering box were and less offset means less interference with sheetmetal. Bump stops will be your friend, get some big cushy ones. I won’t get into driveline at this point, kinda hoping you go for 36-38” instead!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for the advice guys. This is all really helpful. I should mention the Dana 60 front I bought came with crossover steering on it, so I’ve got that covered. The rear end will be clocked as the perches have to be moved anyways. I will defiantly have to look into the angle on the ujoints at the t-case. The tires will be mounted on a 17x9 so that should help with the width. All this said and done, the consensus I’m getting is go with 10” and then find if it rubs. If it rubs, use steering stoppers?
 

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The GM D60 is not the same as a Dodge D60. The perches are about a 1/2" off so you have to bow the springs on a Dodge.

10" of leaf spring is not "suspension" anymore. Either be a man and cut the fenders or go links or radius arm and coils.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
With the 4” drop hangers provided by Jungle Jim, the front springs will be 6” GM lift springs. The rear will be 4” GM lift springs with 2” anti wrap bars. I don’t think it has to be that major of a deal. It’s 10” lift over stock. Not 10” springs.
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FYI, Dodge rear axles are 65" and Chevy is about 67". Dodge D60 front is about 67" and Chevy is 2" wider.

2ndgen dodge axles grow to 70-71".
 

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Buy the wheels and tires last. You can mock it up with stock wheels and when the axles and suspension are sorted out then you get your measurements for offset/backspacing. Once you mount tires on wheels you own them and if they rub then Lanty is going to come over with the sawzall and fix it.
 
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39" tires fit a stock W600 perfectly :)

Bucky
 

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below is my buddy's 87 Ramcharger on 40's with a 3" body lift and about a 4" suspension lift. The rear is not cut but the front absolutely had to have the lower corners trimmed to prevent slicing the expensive meats. His 40's would barely fit before trimming - in order to not touch the fenders you'll likely have to go north about another several inches...and like has been said - unless rockwells are a potential driveline angle 'solution' at that point you truck begins to eat joints and become undrivable and potentially unsafe, and going suspension only will result in an extremely harsh ride. IMO, limiting the steering stops to prevent contacting the fenders would be curing the wrong problem....and then requires a football field to do a u-turn.

Anyway, this should give you a good idea for how much more lift you'd need to clear 40s without cutting.

 
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
All this has me thinking maybe I should run a double cardan joint at the transfer case side of my rear driveshaft to match the front. Maybe that will help with the angle. 😂 Maybe even do a double cardan on both ends of the front driveshaft seeing as rotating the front Dana 60 would be a major pain with the casted in perch on the diff.
 

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the Secret to wheeling : as low a lift as needed to fit the biggest tires , unless of coarse you just want a MALL crawler

perfect example is the 4x4 Mag build of an old Scout with almost NO lift and 40 inch tires , of coarse they sliced and diced the fenders to fit the tires to have them fit with hardly any lift

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what your intended use for the truck once it's on 40's? Daily-driver? Highway? Off-road, and how hard?
 

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A W100 with enough suspension lift to clear 40s with no cutting will be the most unpractical truck you've ever driven, and also the worst to drive
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
what your intended use for the truck once it's on 40's? Daily-driver? Highway? Off-road, and how hard?
All around balance. Around town, under 75mph. Trail riding and light off roading. No crazy rock climbing or anything like that. And towing. Building a 470 big block stroker for the truck mated to the NP435. The truck has been restored, and still needs a few minor things but it’s not going to be run hard and put away wet. Yeah I might smoke the tires or something but that’s about it. I intend to take it to truck shows.

I really didn’t expect this much criticism from everyone. There are plenty of old school builds on 15in wheels and 44s that are plenty practical with full leaf lifts. It was popular back in the day. I’m wanting to build an old school 80s truck like you’d see going to the 4 Wheel Jamboree. I’m even sticking to the old anti wrap bars like in the picture I posted above. Don’t see many of them anymore either. I’m going with narrower 40s on 17x9 wheels for better tire options and clearances but still.
 

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Hello Mikett, I haven't been on here for so long that my account was no longer active. Just to try to help with your question, here are the specs on my truck. I built this truck back in 1992-93, so it IS old-school. It's a 1979 Dodge Power Wagon W150 regular cab short box. 360 c.i. police interceptor, auto trans, Dana 60's front & rear 4:10 ratio, 13.5 inches of lift consisting of 8 inch springs front & rear, 2.5 inch traction lift front & rear, 3 inch body lift. Tires are 38.5 x 15 x 15 inch Super Swampers. It is and always been very street friendly & I can drive it anywhere without the worry of stuffing the tires. Anywhere except rock crawling, it was not built for that, way too tall & totally wrong suspension set up. I like a good amount of wheelwell, which is why I chose the lift & tire size I did. Fenders are not cut, all stock.I could fit 44 inch tires in this truck but I feel I could stuff the tires while hard off roading. With my experience with this truck, I would say you could run 40's safely with 11-12 inches of lift. It will handle just fine on the street. Impractical?? Maybe for loading anything in the box, & climbing in & out of it. But, changing spark plugs through the wheelwells, and changing oil without jacking the truck up are good trade-offs. Hope this helps, good luck with your build!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Hello Mikett, I haven't been on here for so long that my account was no longer active. Just to try to help with your question, here are the specs on my truck. I built this truck back in 1992-93, so it IS old-school. It's a 1979 Dodge Power Wagon W150 regular cab short box. 360 c.i. police interceptor, auto trans, Dana 60's front & rear 4:10 ratio, 13.5 inches of lift consisting of 8 inch springs front & rear, 2.5 inch traction lift front & rear, 3 inch body lift. Tires are 38.5 x 15 x 15 inch Super Swampers. It is and always been very street friendly & I can drive it anywhere without the worry of stuffing the tires. Anywhere except rock crawling, it was not built for that, way too tall & totally wrong suspension set up. I like a good amount of wheelwell, which is why I chose the lift & tire size I did. Fenders are not cut, all stock.I could fit 44 inch tires in this truck but I feel I could stuff the tires while hard off roading. With my experience with this truck, I would say you could run 40's safely with 11-12 inches of lift. It will handle just fine on the street. Impractical?? Maybe for loading anything in the box, & climbing in & out of it. But, changing spark plugs through the wheelwells, and changing oil without jacking the truck up are good trade-offs. Hope this helps, good luck with your build!!
That thing sounds awesome! I would love some pictures. Thanks for the inspiration. What kind of issues did you run into with pinion angles and how did you resolve them? I don’t see the point in clocking my NP241 as it would only help the front, as the rear comes straight out the back. The Dana 60 front also can’t be clocked due to the casted in passenger side spring perch utilizing a single u-bolt design.
 
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