Dodge RamCharger Central banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,442 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Working on my 82 W350, Dana 44 front axle.
Should I go with regreasable u-joints or not?  The ones that are in there don't have grease fittings.  But according to the guy at the parts store, I can get either.
I'll likely be doing the same thing to my RC in the near future.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,558 Posts
If you get greasable ones, you will have to go with the ones that you grease with the needle attachment to your grease gun.  When installed you normally cannot get a grease gun on the Zerk fitting due to the axle shaft yokes.  Personally, I'd steer clear of the parts store U-joints and go with nothing less than a Spicer yoke.  Those are not fun to get to and I wouldn't skimp on the quality of the joint.  It's just cheap insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
The non-greaseable variety are generally stouter, not having the cross drilled for the passage of grease out to all four caps. Since they won't be getting greased they are made with a little better grease seal arrangement too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,442 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In general, it looks like Spicer joints aren't too much more expensive than Precision joints.  Trouble is, I'm having a tough time finding the part number I need.  These are going in a 8-lug Dana44 axle, and I presume those would be the same as the Dana44 in my RC, which would be Precision #371.
What would the Spicer part # be?  5-297?

I'm also seeing some Alloy USA joints that are more expensive.  Anybody heard of them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,442 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
jungle said:
I always use the spicer joints in my axles.
Jim
Got a part number?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,598 Posts
Do not waste your time with the OE type 5-297. It was "good enough" for 30+ years, but when the rubicon (4.10s and 4:1) came out, suddenly it was decided a stronger 44 joint was needed.

Enter 5-760. Dimensionally similar, but made of better material and processes. Cold forged. While strength is increased a little, wear resistance is a big factor. Just what you want in an axle joint, long life.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,442 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
s ǝoɾ said:
Do not waste your time with the OE type 5-297. It was "good enough" for 30+ years, but when the rubicon (4.10s and 4:1) came out, suddenly it was decided a stronger 44 joint was needed.

Enter 5-760. Dimensionally similar, but made of better material and processes. Cold forged. While strength is increased a little, wear resistance is a big factor. Just what you want in an axle joint, long life.

Thanks! That was one of the other part numbers I had seen online, but no real explanation between the two so I wasn't sure which one I wanted. Sounds like the 5-760 is the one I'll look for.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,229 Posts
Good info on the 5-760X U joint, thanks guys  ;)

DB426
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,442 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
s ǝoɾ said:
Were you able to find this joint?
Yes I was. Even found it at a local shop. And they were less than most of the places I saw it online.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,598 Posts
cjohhny said:
Yes I was. Even found it at a local shop. And they were less than most of the places I saw it online.
I wish the dana 60 1480 cold forged joints were quite so cheap, they typically want $50 a piece for the 5-806x joints.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top