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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The transmission on my son's 1990 D150 5.9 (46RH) leaks...A LOT.

It looks like it's leaking from the driver's side, but it's really hard to tell where it's leaking from. It could be coming from the front and blowing back, so hard to tell. I'm thinking that I'd like to just with fixes owners on here have made, see if it helps and then try the next one. I'd love to hear where people fixed leaks on theirs and just start trying fixes until it gets better.

His truck has a lot of miles on it (speedo isn't accurate), so not sure how many, but it runs great and shifts really nicely. But, we're both getting sick of having to add tranny fluid a few times a week and also don't really want to take it in someplace and pay 500+ to get it inspected and fixed, I'd prefer to try to do it myself first.

I'm ok with dropping the valve body if needed.

Any ideas on what to try first? I've looked up some parts diagrams, but having a hard time finding good info so thought I'd ask the great people here.

Thanks for any suggestions or recommendations.
 

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other than the front torque converter seal the other most common leak is the "shift shaft seal " which can be done in the vehicle but is a PITA to do , the "tool" is fairly cheap and works OK , but this job is way easier if you drop the oil pan and pull the valve body out [ fresh fluid and filter never hurts ] this way you can do the complete shift shaft seal repair to the smaller seals , you can do it either way , also the Neutral safety switch gasket tends to leak also





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When I first got my RC it had a similar leak that turned out to be one of the lines to the radiator. It had rusted thru and was hard to find exactly where the fluid was coming from.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
other than the front torque converter seal the other most common leak is the "shift shaft seal " which can be done in the vehicle but is a PITA to do , the "tool" is fairly cheap and works OK , but this job is way easier if you drop the oil pan and pull the valve body out [ fresh fluid and filter never hurts ] this way you can do the complete shift shaft seal repair to the smaller seals , you can do it either way , also the Neutral safety switch gasket tends to leak also





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Great info, thank you.

What are your thoughts about the little one at the top of shaft? Not sure what that one is called.
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I'm finding conflicting information on the shift shaft seal. I found a few from RockAuto and one from Napa, with different measurements but pretty close:
SKF 8017 - 0.813 ID, 1.254 OD
ATP TO15 - 0.9375 ID, 1.254 OD
Timken 8609 - 0.812 ID, 1.254 OD

Napa
NOS - 8017 - 0.813 ID, 1.254 OD

Looks like the ATP is the outlier, so I'm assuming the others are the right ones measuring around 0.813 ID, 1.254 OD.

I'm coming up blank on the tool, anyone know where to find one or have one they're willing to sell (or rent)? Amazon is out and an eBay search comes up empty. :cry:
 

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I've changed several without the tool and without dropping the pan. It is a pain but doable. If you have time etc to take it apart, go that route and change the filter etc.
 
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I've changed several without the tool and without dropping the pan. It is a pain but doable. If you have time etc to take it apart, go that route and change the filter etc.
some just aren't comfy dropping the valve body with the park rod [ even tho it's super simple if you know how ]
 

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Very true. Doing it without disassembly is not complicated and usually the hardest part is laying on the ground and fitting tools where they need to be to pry out the old seal. Then tap it in using a properly sized socket. Easy peasy.
 
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