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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok i have taken over my dads 99 ctd 24v sport and already face issues. it is an auto with overdrive and between 2nd and 3rd it slips. it wont shift to third and if you let off it will just get like caught in between until you lightly ease back into it a couple times. What is the issue and should i get it checked out to prevent something or am i SOL? Also it needs new brakes in the rear and something is out of alignment or bent on the drivers front, because my outside of the tire is cupping. Should i just look for something differnent and trade it off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
anybody? also it used to shift fine if you got in it a bit. now all that does is get you higher rpms and no shift.
 

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Check trans fluid.  If low add and retest.  If fluid is burned, service transmission fully.  If there is a lot of metal and junk in the pan, go no further.  Your trans is Quiznos.  If the pan looks fair, check the linkage, adjust the bands, flush the cooler, refill and retest.  If you still have problems, it's bad. 

The transmission is expensive, rear brakes are expensive, and the front ends on those things get expensive with high miles or lifts (although not even close to as expensive as IFS).  You are talking thousands of dollars in repairs.
 

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concur with giving the tranny a full checkout - fluid flush, check pan for debris, and put in correct oil (possible the current fluid isn't the correct type).  Behind a Cummins, there is a lot asked of those tranny's, so 'maintenance' is very important.
 

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Mad Max said:
concur with giving the tranny a full checkout - fluid flush, check pan for debris, and put in correct oil (possible the current fluid isn't the correct type). Behind a Cummins, there is a lot asked of those tranny's, so 'maintenance' is very important.
Maintenance is the key. There is a real big difference between repair and maintenance, and maintenance and repair.
 

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magnumRC said:
The transmission is expensive
Most definitely, or atleast it can be. Price for a shop is between $1000-$6000 depending on mild-wild build. Torque converters are quite pricey. $500-$1500.

the front ends on those things get expensive with high miles or lifts (although not even close to as expensive as IFS).
Possibly, depending on extent of repairs and if you know how to shop. If you have to replace a unit bearing, you are looking at $150-$200 per side. MAKE SURE to install a grease zerk. If you do that and antiseize the register bore, you could go 1/2 million miles w/o any other hub maintenance (excluding occasional grease injection). A regular dana 44/60 would never do that. It would require ATLEAST periodic adjustment, and more likely a few bearing/seal replacements.

The u joints are standard 1480s like any other dana 60, $50/side, genuine spicer. Ball joints/tire rod ends, nothing exotic here, standard technology. Trackbar frame ball joint could be expensive since it is supposed to be non serviceable. There are various aftermarket fixes. If you chose to repair it with a lukeslink, keep in mind these can be used to rebuild the stock tie rod ends as well. You could end up with control arm wear, but this isn't nearly as common as one would think.

rear brakes are expensive
Not even close. It is the standard drum brake of the past 50+ years. 13" bendix like found on millions of dodges before it. The only difference is the drum is easier to remove compared to D/W series trucks, since it is an outboard. Means no axleshaft/rear hub removal is mandatory. If hub has play or seepage, you may have to address that separately. I bought brand new everything (wheel cylinders, drums, shoes, hardware, star adjuster, even parking brake levers) Using raybestos professional and bendix for most of the parts. Maybe the wheel cylinders might be dorman or wagner, not sure. Only paid $12 for 2 of them, and they were the upgraded 13mm oversized. Rear brakes definitely do not have to be expensive. Maybe if you are converting to rear disc and have to pay $1000 for a kit.
At 230,000 miles, it appears as if the rears may have been originals. The truck was assembled with 2 leftside backing plates (punched for leftside I mean) so it is impossible to access the right side star adjuster on my truck until I punch out the access hole.

How much you spend will directly relate to how good a shopper you are (price matching, deal scouring, ect ect) and how much work you are capable of doing your self.

Down to business:
Tightening your bands will not likely help you. Bands are for reverse/manual 1, and front for 2nd.

You are not complaining about manual 1st, reverse, or 2nd.

You are complaining about 2-3. During this, the front band releases and the front clutch applies (it stays applied for 4th as well) The band could still be applied (binding) but bands do not get tighter with age, so you would have a hydraulic circuit fault if that was the case. If it seemed to hit neutral between the shifts, it is possible a leaking front clutch apply seal causes a lag. That requires a rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info guys. The brakes i am capable of doing. The front end not so much because i don't have the tools to check anything. The transmission i can pull and install but any repair is out of the question. The front isnt the whole front end, just the front drivers side. I suspect during the winter i had to take a ditch to avoid a wreck and i tweaked it.

Ok i know you guys can't make the decision for me but what should i do? I dont have the money to do all the work at once and i can bargain hunt parts but i don't wanna risk shotty parts. Also paying to have someone do my tranny will be alot too.
 

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The biggest $$$ savings will come from the transmission. Straight up. You can see that just based on the wide price range. So go buy some tranny books and read some of the chronicles of torqueflite based transmission tear downs. I used to have a link to a guy who did a diesel 518 at home, it was an excellent blog style entry over a course of many many months. Pat and dodgeman did good 727 tear down pictures. Most of the info still applies. This job gets a lot of labor dollars due to consumer fear. My buddy just plunked down $1200 for a stock 48RE rebuild job. There was about $150 in parts involved. R&R is worth about $300. The rest paid for the labor to do the job (and parts markup), which was completed that same day. Up to about $2000 range, most of the parts remain stock type, with possible exception of converters/valve body tweaks.

"Don't have the tools to check the front end"
That is absolutely not true. I know this, because you have the ability to use a computer. You may even be able to find a tape measure at Dollar World. That can be used to get some rather crude but effective numbers, side-side. I did big truck alignments for several years using a piece of string. A toe-and-go. An angle finder is available for $10, and with a little practice can be used to help find tweaked parts. So can a simple level. So can a square. Can do other things with a string and lug nut, ala "plumb bob".

That is not going to get you precision race quality alignment, nor would I even say it is safe for you to simply "toe-and-go". You CAN find many tweaked parts using simple procedures and improvised tools though. At which point you can replace the correct part, road test, retorque, and have a final alignment performed by a alignment specialist. Save a lot of labor by making THEIR job as simple as possible. Learn a lot more about the processes involved, so they cannot pull the wool over your eyes. "uh ya, your whole axle is all fudged up, you need a new one" Having observant eyes and remarkable logic/common sense, is the absolute most important tools a mechanic could possess.

Mercedes Dealer Ripoff
 
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