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It's basically a Mitsubishi Pajero, and actually has somewhat decent aftermarket support, but it's expensive and usually most parts have to be sourced from overseas.  There used to be one on the lot at the dealership I worked at.  It had a V6, but was a little on the gutless side by modern standards.  Supposedly it was pretty good in the snow, but too low to do much serious off roading stock but I never drove it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One of those niche vehicles. Good if you are realistic about it's limitations..it looked like a decent grocery getter, for someone in a hilly terrain, with frequent snow during the winter. Not very heavy. Put a good winch on it, it would seem possible.. and I'm sure it actually could go anywhere.  However I'm sure I would run our of usable space quick. It would be very interesting to see one of those lifted, large tires and some modifications for off roading like the Ramcharger..  I searched the net, almost every ad posted ...was apparently a quick sale. The on line auction proved you correct replacement and aftermarket parts are now expensive. If I'm going to put out those USDs I'm going to put it on the BIG Brother RC....Regards..
 

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There are a lots of pics of them out there modified. They were once pretty popular overseas, but you won't find much about the rebadged Dodge Raider, you need to search for the Mitsubishi Pajero or even the Montero.



To me that pic is a little mislieading as at first glace, it appears as large as a Land Cruiser but it's really just on 33s and not much larger than a Geo Tracker. Still kind of cool, but pretty well overshadowed by things like the 4Runner and Jeep XJ here in the states.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's more like it, that's really a nice efficient little package...  The color looks like a Hunters Green..  Getting my Project 85 repainted again re Hunter's Green, the sun in FL really cooks paint down here... My clear coat has pealed off ..since that pic was taken..I rewired everything engine,body under dash.. Borgeson lower shaft, Holley 500 cfm.with a 14 diameter  X 3 in Spectra air filter on a base with a lid.  Replaced the fusible links with a Ford Ranger under hood distribution box re MAXI fuses.. installed a 01 suburban 1500 LT 3rd row seat in place of the old rear bench seat. did a body lift 3 in, running 31X 10.5 R 15..on a set of the hard to find turbine wheels, also got a 5th for the spare.. dropped the gas tank, cleaned it reinstalled the sending unit, with a new steel gas line to the mach pump, ripped out the entire smog system, pulled the EGR and blocked it with a EGR plate from a 1980..Had the heads removed cleaned, rocker s etc checked.. replaced the exhaust manifolds with 1980s (no smog pump air ports in those) Everything I do I try to upgrade to improve reliability, and also do preventative maintenance..  I wish there was an easy way to install AC on our old rigs that used the R 12  etc..  It's a must have here in FL. I tried to get my AC back up a few years back.. with the help of an friend who retired from the AC business, he had a bunch of R 12.. It ran slightly cool for a few days then faded, no doubt another system leak...that we could never find.. You would think that some one would have developed an after market separate, stand alone AC electrically driven, say installed in the rear side panels vs a belt driven inside the engine compartment method. That's the most stressful place you could put an AC in, heat, vibration, issues with pipes and lines.      I really like those large driving lamps and the bumper bar.  I want to copy that look for the for my 85 RC.. I would bet that with a little care that thing could easily last 20 years.. keep good wax or polymer based type on it, and keep it garaged..and the paint would look factory fresh..               

It's a shame that really good practical, rugged machines often don't get the popularity that's deserved..  Thanks re the PIC.. Sorry to ramble....    As always.. Regards..
 

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EDDIEK said:
I wish there was an easy way to install AC on our old rigs that used the R 12 etc.. It's a must have here in FL. I tried to get my AC back up a few years back.. with the help of an friend who retired from the AC business, he had a bunch of R 12.. It ran slightly cool for a few days then faded, no doubt another system leak...that we could never find.. You would think that some one would have developed an after market separate, stand alone AC electrically driven, say installed in the rear side panels vs a belt driven inside the engine compartment method. That's the most stressful place you could put an AC in, heat, vibration, issues with pipes and lines.
There is. Use the brackets and condenser for a stock system (grab from a junked v-8 Dodge product) and run an aftermarket under dash AC evaporator unit. I am doing this setup in both my 76 D100 and 82 Ramcharger. Fairly cheap and easy to do. The most expensive things are the tools to make the custom lines, but if you have a frined in the AC business you can probably do it cheap. If you have factory in-dash AC then just order new lines and o-rings from rockauto. Cheap and very easy to do.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Reed:
Thank You... 
I kept and used the OEM compressor, bought an expansion valve, evaporator..  for the last attempt that failed.
When it failed, I pulled the Compressor and wrapped it up in plastic for future use, I then pulled and tossed..the OEM condenser..  and wrapped up the expansion valve to seal out airborne contaminants and humidity from getting to it and the evaporator.
When I begin the 2nd attempt, if the stock compressor is still functional. should I stick with it or just get a new replacement  "Four Seasons" or other aftermarket ??
I replaced the climate control for the AC/Heat with a new rThe . ..
I will buy a new condenser and drier, and connecting hoses.. On line ..e-bay seems to have enough at decent prices.. The JYards here are not worth gambling time or money, management is lax and much of what you would buy 15 - 20- 30 years ago you would not buy today..  People just tear everything up..
  Once it's all together, I know I will have to have it vacuumed out and leak tested..  Thanks for the information..   
ED K
 

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EDDIEK said:
Reed:
Thank You...
I kept and used the OEM compressor, bought an expansion valve, evaporator.. for the last attempt that failed.
When it failed, I pulled the Compressor and wrapped it up in plastic for future use, I then pulled and tossed..the OEM condenser.. and wrapped up the expansion valve to seal out airborne contaminants and humidity from getting to it and the evaporator.
When I begin the 2nd attempt, if the stock compressor is still functional. should I stick with it or just get a new replacement "Four Seasons" or other aftermarket ??
I replaced the climate control for the AC/Heat with a new rThe . ..
I will buy a new condenser and drier, and connecting hoses.. On line ..e-bay seems to have enough at decent prices.. The JYards here are not worth gambling time or money, management is lax and much of what you would buy 15 - 20- 30 years ago you would not buy today.. People just tear everything up..
Once it's all together, I know I will have to have it vacuumed out and leak tested.. Thanks for the information..
ED K
If the compressor is in good shape, drain it completely of all oil and you can reuse it. I would buy all new hoses and other parts from Rockauto. They hoses will be compatible with modern refrigerants. Use the correct oil and new o-rings and you should be good to go. Don't forget to pull a vacuum on the system before you charge it the first time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Reed:  I copied all of the info you provided, for when I begin that portion of the resto. Except for engine rebuilds and AC I have pretty much done everything else over the past few decades..  Thank you for making the AC issue more approachable.. It is a critical must have here in FL from mid May to late Sep..  So having the RC restored to a reasonable level now makes sense, and the Mrs will then actually get back into it... Thanks again for your kind help... ED K
   
 

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My friend had one I high school. He liked it enough to spend $2,000 on a new engine.  They come with a compass and tilt gauge mounted on the dash. It was narrow and top heavy. I drove it a few times. Once felt it raise up on two wheels. Granted it was an odd curve that was somewhat sharp and went into a decline at the apex. It definitely isn’t suited for the evasive maneuvers that are required to drive on the roads these days.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"evasive maneuvers" (EM) ?  I do understand what you mean..  EM I have used to avoid the idiots on the road !!  I'm a young 66  been driving since 16, all climates snow, hurricanes, altitudes from sea level to 14K feet.. various locations of CONUS..  I undersand the "narrow and top" heavy..    I would think that installing widest width and largest diameter tires possible under that vehicle, would cure that issue..  There are people on this site that are far more qualified than I, to give a definitive answer on that.  Sure would be neat to see a vehicle properly equipped...
to prove that.. Ed
 

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I just really hope tiny economy cars come back in style. (Geo, neon, colt, raider) I grew up with these $300 beaters.
Fun, cheap, and perfect for us 15, 16 kids that couldn’t be trusted with anything more powerful than a Briggs and Stratton.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi Rabbit 929:
I hope tiny economy cars come back.. $300 beaters.etc etc..
a teen in the late 60s any car you had was cherished. Because most of your friends still used a bus. There was no such term as a "beater". No one in school could take out a loan for a car. Whatever you had you fixed up. New paint, new wheels etc.. It was freedom.  Nothing wrong with a $300 beater, not many of us can afford to learn from our screw ups on a 911 Porsche.. Right ?? 
I hope I'm wrong. But If you can, U might squirrel away a beater for your offspring.. Then again they are conditioning people to not to try to solve their own problems.... and most people unlike the WW II generation are not into the DIY thing. As a Teen in the late 60s, I visited the newsstand magazine store, to find out of date, month old hot rod magazines, for 50 cents, that had part of their cover removed. I recall reading about the first Hot Rodders of the 1950s who back.... from the war, created their own Rods from T Buckets, mated up Ford Flatheads to some other odd ball transmission, made their own headers, installed Jag rear ends, chopped and channeled the bodies, and raced out in California and on the salt flats.. I read these magazines of the late 1960s.. that during the war, WW 2, many war production factory workers were encouraged to bring their work gear home, such as drills etc to replace the brushes, so they could start fresh drilling holes in aircraft sheet metal the next day / shift. That was when our survival was at stake. That I believe created the DIY concept. Prior to that, kids in the 30s just removed the front fenders from their fords to look cool, and cruised around with friends sitting behind in the "Rumble seat"..   
Sadly I listened to a pod cast about two years back to comments made by a retired auto engineer from one of the US BIG 3, who opined that the autonomous car / vehicle was a fore gone conclusion. Why ? He described the industrial concensus of modern American driver as distracted. I think what he was politely saying was that drivers today are distracted, meaning they are on the phone, applying make up, texting, eating etc etc. and are too stupid to be relied upon to apply the "brakes" when needed. I must agree.    So I don't see much of a future for after market products, except for the superficial cosmetic..and sound e.g. radios and speakers.. etc and stuff.
You just can't drop in a cam or an intake manifold, or headers etc etc.. like in the 60s, and 70s.... 
Regards.. Ed
 

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Eddiek, I’m damn near heartbroken to hear that. But it’s true.
My grandparents were of that generation, last grandma left just died at 76 less than a week ago.
So I happened to see the old farm I grew up on with all my uncles and grandparents vehicles and what-not, nothin worth saving body wise. Because they didn’t really get parked till they were totaled. He fixed everything.

Same old tractors, cars, everything. Last thing he bought was his 93 w250 Cummins with a manual. Still sittin out there. 45,000 but uncle wouldn’t sell it.

The age of the diy’er is dying, and the life of a motorcyclist is becoming a death note.
The new cars (and tractors for that matter) are becoming so sophisticated that I wonder how many of them will still be around after 40 years like those old Oliver’s, M’s & farmalls.
I realized what the car markets become when I bought a 2012 Durango and by the time I paid it off the bank said it’s only worth $5000 at 67k.
Too many new cars that are too expensive and hold no value.

I wouldn’t be surprised if vehicles in the future just become temporary leases only for those of us at the peasent incomes.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
R929...Sorry to hear about Grandma
they were special. Mine raised me first 5 yrs. We were city, folks, they were the first born here, one of my first memories was watching her make Struedel. The first ones over were from farms too. They were in their 80s, in the late 1940s.
I can recall similar farm images via many summer visits to an aunt n uncle's farm in Rock Hall, MD. Funny.... My grandma showed me how she wove a door mat (this is 1961 or so) out of those long plastic bags re "Wonder bread" it seemed fairly rugged stuff. Once the bag was rinsed and dried, I'll bet that early plastic was very durable. I can recall her starting to prep n cook for dinner, in the afternoon. Repurposing, things was a way they saved money, and raised their standard of living without extraordinary debt. There were no such things as credit cards. Many people in the neighborhood had a tab, with the corner sole proprietor/ butcher. They had less things, but seemed happier.
My uncle is 83, the last of that era, who can relate stories about the great depression, told me how his grandma from Germany asked him what he wanted for Christmas. He replied ..."an orange". He did get ONE orange. Every Christmas, he buys oranges.
Great grand fathers were carpenters, stone masons, one a grease maker, often the women would work in knitting mills. They weren't consumed with accumulating stuff. My boys in their 30s also have that "fix it" trait, to a lesser degree. This blog is a great tool, it allows us to fix these rugged RCs etc, that may not otherwise get a new start. Actually it's not much different than a community of Amish doing that barn raising thing....
I do have some hope,  there's a small trend of millineals "decluttering" it also seems that many are not rushing out for the newest smart phone, when the one they have works just fine... that happened with laptops and desktops.
Generations go through forgetting and rediscovering past lessons learned. I think that will happen to many when they discover they can fix things, when they must....when they can no longer pile on more debt.
Regards friend.
Ed K

 

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Strudels and kraut were what it was about!
My grandmother grew and produced everything they ate at home. The only thing she didn’t want to make was bread. So she made candles to buy bread! Lol
 

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When our fortunes improved we became more mainstreamed, but I clearly recall my mom and aunt making their own clothes and used patterns for the new fashions (this was in the 70s), we did most of our own home repairs (basic plumbing, carpentry, painting), clipped coupons and shopped only for sale items etc.

Similar story - maternal grandma was widowed in the 1930s in South America and paternal grandfather abandoned the family leaving my 15-year-old dad to literally support his family, and my mom and her sisters having to leave school and work as seamstresses, do domestic work, all as children. There was no waste in my home growing up.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Rabbit929 & ToxicDoc.. I count my self very lucky to have had my relatives, just like yours... I and the Mrs, have had some rough times, but dilligence and hard work, and *** a little luck never hurts. A friend of mine once said, the harder you work ( I would add also, the smarter you work).. the luckier you are..
All of what those good people taught me helped sustain me through tough times.
Gonna say a prayer for them,and yours too !!  Oh...our RCs..... back during the "cash for clunkers" our two boys, now men with families etc, tried to convince me to let the "Beast" 😜  my 85 Ramcharger go.. At the time. they were probably shaking their heads..I probably sounded like any other older Dad,  stuck in his ways... They both are doing well, better still they are absolute bargain hunters, wary of scams, avoid un necessary debt, understand what assets appreciate vs those that depreciate, and do much of their own DIY home etc stuff, when it makes sense..... Sure is great when the lights go on, and the give you that "knowing" look.. Dad was way ahead of us, etc etc... What's important is that, they "get it"...now 😊.. and apply that insight re new situations re current times.
P.S. My only intractable problem, is .. I'm still working on trying to get grandma's recipe re.. strudel dough thin enough to read news print....through it etc etc etc..
The aftermath ??  my lace curtain Irish descent wife, spends 3 days afterward treating the kitchen like a crime scene. Says, why don't  I quit retirement, go back "on the job"..
.....NAH 😝... I may be crazy but I'm not stupid
ED
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I was working for a car crushing outfit during the cash for clunkers.
That was a very deep government ordeal, to try to get old cars off the road force people to buy new to “bump” the economy. New cars aren’t selling like they are supposed to, but you can’t slow down the production of them as contracts and jobs have to be met, etc.

All the Cash For Clunkers cars had acid poured into all fluids specifically designed to burn em up. No parts were to be sold from these but minor body panels and interior. And all had to be crushed in a max of two years.

Obama thought he bumped the economy but he actually caused a stalemate with dealerships the coming years after.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
All that Barry did was to accelerate future sales (that would have naturally occurred over the normal period of time when their practical if not "pre-mature" life would have ended.. The average motorist is woefully ignorant of preventative maintenance).. into a near term window to give an atrifical bump to the economy. With that, millions of operational hours - left in and unused in those power plants was lost forever.... and those dollars that were spent did not return the full value to the consumer. Also with that overbought market..you have the present and future glut of unsold vehicles... I watched videos of those vehicles, it was so sad watching perfectly good engines straining to continue after being administered the poison pill.... NEVER underestimate the stupidity of mostof the American electorate.. Whatever happened to "Waste Not - Want not" ??

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/waste+not%2C+want+not
"Waste not, Want not"..
Wise use of one's resources will keep one from poverty. For example, I just hate to throw out good food-waste not, want not. This proverbial saying was first recorded in 1772 but had an earlier, even more alliterative version, willful waste makes woeful want (1576).

P.S. Hopefully No Dodge Raiders were lost in the BHO automotive genocide !!! NEVER AGAIN !!
 
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