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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys, my truck is gonna be seeing alot of cold weather this winter as i'll most likely be moving to colorado. I've never lived anywhere that had snow or dropped below 50 degrees. I'm wondering what am i gonna need to do to this thing to make it winter/cold friendly? I know there are things you are supposed to use in the cold such as the choke, but is there anything else i'd need? engine block heater?

any input would be great....thanks
-Nick
 

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make sure the choke works, exhaust manifold stove/ducting that puts warmed air into the air cleaner, exhaust manifold damper thingy that makes the exhaust gasses cross over from one side of the intake manifold to the other directly under the carb to help with fuel atomization, and polypropylene underwear.
Get a spare set of wheels to keep your studded snow tires on....

Oh, yeah, the full 195 degree thermostat, forget the 180 or lower numbers....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks bill, i have a spare set of wheels but i'm a little worried about the offset on them and my wheel bearings, i'll have to get out the measuring tape and check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
one more question, am i gonna have to get another battery? I have a duralast gold or something from autozone right now, brand new...is this gonna be able to handle the cold? sorry if i'm a little naive. This cold is gonna knock me on my ass, but i dont want that to happen to my truck ;D
 

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Funny related story, a friend in Idaho thought it wise to carry sand in his truck, and a shovel. good idea, but get it in the water resistant bags. He got loose sand poured in on top of his spare tire which we all know belongs under the truck bed, not in it. Sand got wet, wet sand got frozen, he got a flat, spare was buried under frozen sand.
Definitely get a heater of some kind.
 

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When you see temps that are freezing and below that for a good period of time i would use a block or oil pan heater, it takes along time for the oil to get to operating temps and cold oil is thick and slow going so at start up things can get worn quickly, so if it was me i would install either or
 

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A block heater/ coolant heater is a must. My truck's choke isn't hooked up, but If i plug it in, it will almost always start up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
how does an oil pan heater work? I've got the milodon offroad deep pan on there now so I have a little room to add some heat.
 

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One we frequently forget is the little "hotpad" for the battery. Your present battery should be just fine, but at zero, it'll only put out about half it's "normal ooomph.

I like the water heaters, because your body heater works instantly!
Here's the selction at JCWitless

edit: shortened the link
 

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Since 1973, I've been using tank heaters for my vehicles. You'll hear them refered to as engine tank heaters, inline tank heaters, circulating tank heaters, engine coolant system heaters, etc.

What they do is keep your coolant antifreeze/water quite warm during the winter. What I really like about them is the "instant heat" I get when I turn on the defrosters on a winter morning.

As for the oil pan, I just use a magnetic oil pan heater. When the temp gets down to -40F, oil doesn't flow worth a damn.

 
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Hey Nick, you're moving to Colorado, not the Arctic. Along the front range, we may get a couple weeks of really cold weather, highs in the single digits and lows in the double below digits, but overall our winters are fairly mild.

Use a good 10-40 oil, change it regulary. Flush and check your cooling system and maintain a 50/50 mix of anti-freeze. Keep it tuned and the choke properly adjusted. For those really cold mornings, have some starting fluid and a battery charger handy. That will get you thru a typical Colorado winter. Forget the studded snows. 95% of the time you will be on dry roads. We get snow, but it normally melts off within the next 24 to 48 hours. The studs won't last a full winter and they'll drive you crazy with the noise. The tank heaters are nice, but most folks around here don't use them. And stay with the 180 thermostat, you won't need any more than that. Also, keep in mind, you will have to dial in a few more degrees of timing advance because of the altitude. Try 2 to 4 more degrees advance and go from there.

Best advise. Figure out your directions. Never park your truck facing north. Try to park facing east so the morning sun can melt the ice from your windshield.
 

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Hmmm, park your truck facing East, and howl at the full moon to make sure it starts...
Sounds like an old Indian trick to me (hogan doors "always" face the rising sun).

Actually PG's right, especially if you're just moving to the Front Range, although the water heaters sure do make it nice in the morning... Now, if you were going to be in Purgatory, or Silverton, or Estes Park...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i guess i'm freaking out about the climate change, reading through posts i'd hear "only if you are in cold weather" and i'd just dismiss it, never figured i'd need it later....thanks for all the info guys
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
so now that i know how to keep it running happy-like in the winter, now i just need to make it comfortable for me.

1. put hard top on
2. new weather stripping all around
3. new carpet
4. replace broken heater core
5. go to junk yard and get all the missing duct pieces i need.

this is gonna be fun... ;D
 

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Go put oil in your fridge and freezer and see the effects yourself, then make your own decision, i don't live in the artic but heating your oil is a good thing, even do it with syn oil and see the effects
 

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Don't forget that plugging in your truck overnight costs $$$. The more heaters you put on, the more it costs.

My '87 used to cost roughly $1.50 per night to plug in (about 10 hours). It had two 15 watt battery heaters (two batts), a 40 watt oil pan heater, a 20 watt tranny pan heater, 20 watt diff heater, 1000 watt circulating heater, 800 watt block heater, and an 600 watt interior heater. Total approx 2500 watts....yes I could melt a standard outdoor extension cord, but the poor truck had to start even if it was -60*F (Doesn't happen often here, but -40 to -50 is common in Dec-Jan-Feb)

If you won't be seing anything under -20*, I would go with a battery heater (NOT a battery blanket---they can boil off the water in the batt), oil pan heater, and a block heater. I personally do not like circulating heaters because my luck with them is they last 2 years, then quit working. Block heaters also draw less power. The down side is you lose your "instant heat".

W/o a tranny heater, I would let your truck/RC warm up in neutral, so the trans is actually pumping fluid and warming it up. The diff fluid will still be stiff, but will make for less wear on your trans.

BTW, Mobil 1 10w-30 synthetic pours just fine at -45*F. Dino oil starts to look like peanut butter at about -20*F.

-SM
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thanks for the info guys, my colorado plans kinda hit the fan so i'm gonna be staying in arizona for a bit...burning my ass on the seats..door handles, steering wheel, seatbelt, 160 degree heat inside the truck.....why did i ever wanna leave? ;D
 
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