Dodge RamCharger Central banner
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Keep the routing that runs the fluid thru the stock radiator, in addition to the aftermarket cooler ?

Or

Just run the lines to the aftermarket cooler ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,560 Posts
I run just the aftermarket cooler. Seems fine, and has at least 2 advantages I can think of. If the cooler part in your rad developes a leak it can suck antifreeze into your tranny and thats the end of that before a rebuild I think. Also it makes changing the rad (if you get a leak or puncture the rad) a lot easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I ran mine cooler only and it takes a while for the fluid to warm up in the winter. The tranny slips until the fluid is warm. The motor is pulled for a rebuild right now and when it goes back in, I'll run the line to the radiator and then to the cooler. That way the coolant will help it warm up in the winter and the cooler still does its thing in the summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
i run cooler only, and after driving for an hour the line coming out of the tranny cooler is cool to the touch. I dont think running it through the radiator would help you any. I'm using the B&M stacked plate cooler (24,000lb) and i highly suggest it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,070 Posts
I run cooler only on my trans, it doesn't slip in the winter ever, on that issue i think you may have a pump problem developing since the motor isn't hot either and doesn't hit temp instantly either, anyway i run all my autos on the cooler only, the raditor is lighter without the built in cooler.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,548 Posts
On factory equiped vehicles with external coolers its always ran through the radiator then to the external cooler then back to tranny. I think thats the way you should do it for maximum cooling. I'm thinking that its normal for a tranny line to read 220 degrees. If ran through a radiator that could drop it down to 150-180 or so. Its possible in an older radiator for crud to build up around the tranny tube in the radiator making it less efficient but they still do help. Then routing it out to an external cooler would drop it even more. How much depends on size and ambient temps. The cooler you run transmission fluid the longer it will last.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,070 Posts
Actually this is why i run 180 stats in motors, it is not good to run trans at 220 that is borderline kill temp, just get that car/truck stuck for a little bit and it won't be long before it's AFU, the temps you should operate a auto trans is between 180 and 200 not higher than that, you can if you want but it won't last long, so if you llike to play in mud and snow and sand get a trans temp guage and keep your eye on it
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,548 Posts
Ok i might of been a little high on my guestiment on the output trans temp. I also use a 180 thermostat in my 94 Ram to keep the tranny temps that much cooler since the 518's aren't that reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
I think it depends on where you live. In extreme cold areas, the fluid should run thru the external cooler first, then thru the radiator cooler, so that you won't be overcooling your fluid in winter time. If you never leave the hot areas like southern AZ, TX, or NM, just the opposite might be preferred.
Anywhere else, install quick disconnects so you can switch it around. ;D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Now that's an idea! If I go from here (4000 ft and hot) 15 miles to Cloudcroft at almost 9000 feet... and lose the average 5 degrees per thousand feet in ambient temperature... LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,231 Posts
chrysler300le said:
On factory equiped vehicles with external coolers its always ran through the radiator then to the external cooler then back to tranny....
Not entirely true. My tranny was originally set up with an external cooler and absolutely no provisions for a radiator mounted tranny cooler. It was that way in the donor truck and it's that way now with the engine in my RC.

If you're really concerned with the tranny fluid not getting warmed up, all you gotta do is add a tranny thermostat and bypass. It's also a good idea to add a trans temp gauge.

Ed
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nah, not terribly worried about it, because I'm unlikely to stress the truck that much. More a point of academic curiosity than real need.
 
G

·
Most, if not all, tranny cooler manyfacturers suggest bypassing the radiator all together. Frankly. I don't know why you would want to add a cooler and then run it thru the hotter radiator. If you're involved in a lot of stop and go driving, add a small 12v fan with shroud and a temp gauge. With a manual switch, you can control the tranny temp independant of the engine temp.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's a "cool" idea ! Or just use a temp sensor and let it switch automatically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
I saw at a JunkYard the biggest tranny cooler ever, at first glance I thought it was an AC condenser. It was on an older Dodge truck or ramcharger, forget which, and someone was pulling it. One that size is big enough to take the large variety electric fans. Probably a big enough cooler for when Smokey is towing his lunch bucket, beer cooler, and collection of thong underwear......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
The one on my crewcab dually is big also. I thought it was the ac at first but it is a big tranny cooler about the size of the radiator. Mine is run through both cooler and radiator, i thought about just using the cooler being it is that big.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
29,380 Posts
Personally, I'd run just like the factory did it, both rad and auxillary.
One thing you radiator cooler opposers need to remember, is that if you are running a 195 thermastat, that doesn't mean that is the temperature your tranny fluid will "see". The rad cooler is in the bottom of the radiator which is the cooled side.
If your cooling system is working properly, and you have a 195 stat, you'll have approximatley 195-205 (estimate) degree coolant going into the top of your radiator, then it flows through the cores to the bottom (where the tans cooler is) and gets cooled on the way, I'm going to guess around 10-20 degrees.
I recall reading 180 degrees being ideal, or at least close to ideal for a trans. SO with a properly working cooling system, you're probably already there. Now add to it the benefit of an auxillary cooler, and I'd say you're doing alright.
Also, in my expirience, vehicles that don't have a aux cooler from the factory, STILL have a radiator cooler, my motorhome is this way, yes, a MOTORHOME. This should show that a radiator cooler does have merit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,070 Posts
How well your radiator cools is important and yes it is at the cooler end of the radiator but if you run a 200 stat or 195 stat don't forget that the coolant isn't constantly running over the fluid and that the fluid in the trans is getting hotter and also the trans is heating up the coolant that is waiting for the stat to open and circulate it, this is why when your getting stuck in the mud and snow and sand you risk killing your trans, although i love water cooling over air, oil doesn't cool as fast as water, i know it will help to run through the factory rad and then the air cooler not the other way around, but a larger aux trans cooler is good idea, also don't forget your motor home has alot more coolant capacity then your RC and has atleast a 4 core radiator and usually rather large 4 core radiators, deep trans pans and some other little helpful options.
A lot of rc's/trucks have 2 core and single core radiators.

The temps you want for a trans are 180 to 200, but without a guage you will never know what it's doing.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top