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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

What would you recommend for a 77 dodge 318 - stock. Forgot to ask what the previous owner had put in it. Seeing a bunch of different things online - so wanted to just go ahead and ask you guys.

Appreciate any feedback.

Thanks!
 

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good quality 10-30 or 15-40 all year . regular oil . I'm now using Shell Rotella , from Central Tractor due to cost , usta run Castrol  (  IMO )
 

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jaymg717 said:
Hey Guys,

What would you recommend for a 77 dodge 318 - stock. Forgot to ask what the previous owner had put in it. Seeing a bunch of different things online - so wanted to just go ahead and ask you guys.

Appreciate any feedback.

Thanks!
10W-30 is a good basic oil weight. With a lot of miles, I generally run 10W-40 to compensate for internal wear. Just go with one major brand and stick with it. Mixing different brands and weights can sometimes cause the chemical make up of the oil to break down. Lots of chemistry goes into multiweight oil. 10W-30 isn't 10 weight or 30 weight. It flows like 10 weight oil would at freezing and flows like 30 weight would at a higher temperature.
 

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nothing but shell rottella 15w40 in my rigs also. been running it in my 81 the longest and seen about a 5-20psi increase in compression from previous compression test and the 1 i did a few year ago and there was very little if any change between wet and dry test. solid 180psi accross all 8 cylinders. if it is good enough to keep a diesel clean and running millions of miles it should be good enough to keep a 318 running millions of miles.
 

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flows like 30 weight at higher temps ... yeah , next 2 times you change your oil , 1st do it in cold , with cold motor next time run the motor on highway an hour , drive right into shop and drop the oil plug ... while its flamin hot ... see for your self how it really flows ... now picture the "NEW" oils inna Ford .. 5/20 weight ... hot like that .... (old fellas can only shake their heads in wonder ....) LOL yeah the old dodge 318/360's like 15-40 or thicker 20/50 even.
 

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dodge82273 said:
flows like 30 weight at higher temps ... yeah , next 2 times you change your oil , 1st do it in cold , with cold motor next time run the motor on highway an hour , drive right into shop and drop the oil plug ... while its flamin hot ... see for your self how it really flows ... now picture the "NEW" oils inna Ford .. 5/20 weight ... hot like that .... (old fellas can only shake their heads in wonder ....) LOL yeah the old dodge 318/360's like 15-40 or thicker 20/50 even.
He was exactly right, that is what the ratings mean, but I think you misunderstood....

A 10w30 flows like a 10w would in cold temps and flows like a 30w would at high temps.

In a conventional 10w30, they start with 10w base and add polymers to achieve the 30 weight rating at temp. The polymers are strands of material that coil up when cold (for better flow) and unwind into long strands at higher temps, to "hold the oil together" better.

Which brings up another point....10w40 was mentioned, but is a terrible idea (if you could even find it anymore). The reason is that it requires a lot of polymers to achieve that weight span. The polymers don't lubricate, the oil does, so the more polymers, the less lubricity, that's why you never see 10w40 recommended any more. Fortunately, synthetics don't have this issue because they can be blended with very few, or no, polymers to achieve the same result.
 

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A good 10w30 or 10w40 weight oil is great with a 77 model though make sure it has the zinc in it if I'm not correct someone let me know most oils have reduced that. I work for an oil company and called our lab to make sure ours does since I just rebuilt an engine and used a flat tappet cam.
 

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KThaxton said:
He was exactly right, that is what the ratings mean, but I think you misunderstood....

A 10w30 flows like a 10w would in cold temps and flows like a 30w would at high temps.

In a conventional 10w30, they start with 10w base and add polymers to achieve the 30 weight rating at temp. The polymers are strands of material that coil up when cold (for better flow) and unwind into long strands at higher temps, to "hold the oil together" better.

Which brings up another point....10w40 was mentioned, but is a terrible idea (if you could even find it anymore). The reason is that it requires a lot of polymers to achieve that weight span. The polymers don't lubricate, the oil does, so the more polymers, the less lubricity, that's why you never see 10w40 recommended any more. Fortunately, synthetics don't have this issue because they can be blended with very few, or no, polymers to achieve the same result.
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thanks but i do understand the idea , but I have personally also seen 30 wt when it was hot and 10-30 when it was hot , for many years , and when I saw the new engines 5-20 hot , was shocked , thinking my pee is more viscous ( thicker ... )
 

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When I had the 360 rebuilt, he told me to use 10w-30 or 10w-40 full synthetic as soon as I was done with break in.  I settled on Mobil 1.  I typically drive enough to do two oil changes a year.  One in the spring and one in the fall.  10w-40 goes in in March and 10w-30 goes in October.  I haven't had any problems and I love how stable the viscosity is compared to a convential oil.  One of the big things you get out of synthetic is base stock is more inform and more stable.  That means less polymers for a given spread.  Run a 190F thermostat and that motor will last as long as possible.
 

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if it is not good enough for a diesel engine i wouldn't run it. what about additives? i don't know if i would on my truck since the engine in it is pretty worn out and likely needs new bearing but i have seen stuff like motorkote which seems like it would probably work pretty good at protecting an engine
www.youtube.com/watch?v=88vwUwa3igQ
 

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I personally wouldn't use or recommend a diesel oil because they have a different additive package for use in those engines. Oils for a gas engine have a GF-5 rating for now and diesels oil have 2 different rating a CK-4 and an FK-4 or commonly referred to as commercial and non-commercial use it mainly has to do with the sulfur content in the diesel fuel. After 20 years in the oil business and dealing with the lab on different issues I have learned a great deal about them and especially with the newer engines coming out and the low tolerances.
 

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the post asked about a 1977 318 dodge , NOT a new engine , and today all the diesel is low sulfur anyway . Having to maintain both in the fleets I serviced for years , I found the specs required by folks like Cummins and Caterpillar for their 40 thousand dollar engines were always better than Dodge's for their 3 k motors .  NO I would NOT put 15-40 in a new auto that had a spec for 5-20 , at least not untill the warrentee ran out . I also have seen the remminats of stuff like STP in street driven motors ,( warmed / parked / warmed / parked NOT raced then oil changed) thick gunk in all the low spots ......
 

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ya i wouldn't run diesel oil in new vehicles. heck most of the new engines are extremely picky about about oil. i know i use to read about the new hemi's tick with some oils and less or not at all with others. with old engines you can put nearly any oil in them and they will run forever as long as you keep them topped up. i know my dad has put all sorts or oil in his dodges as long as it was free or super cheap and his ran perfect up till the day someone ran it with not enough oil in it. still ran but ran like crap after. at least the diesel oil additives will keep the inside of the engine clean and running strong for a long time as long as you keep it topped up. i have even heard people say that after running 15w40 for an engines entire life the inside of the engine looked brand new inside but then again i have heard of dodges running just fine with slightly bent push rods ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Appreciate all the suggestions here - prob going to run with 10w-30. Feel very fortunate to have you guys to bounce ideas off of.
 

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10w30 or 10w40 would be fine.

To repeat 70sdodge's point, most crucial thing is to add ZINC. Your '77 engine has a flat lifter cam. "Modern" oils have low zinc content to protect oxygen sensors and catalytic converters, which is not an issue in a roller-cam engine. Low zinc in a flat-lifter means worn cam lobes.

Add a zinc supplement like STP or Hughes.
 

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the zinc issue is a real issue.  I 'think' most of the 15-40 diesel oils still have the zinc in them but not sure which - it's one of the reasons I'm likely to go with 15-40 Delo diesel oil in my older 440 when I put it back together... - it's either that or add a bottle of Lucas zinc additive to each oil change, which is really simple
 
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