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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New guy from ND

I just bought an 84 W250 that originaly had a 318 but now has a 360 W/original 727/208 not sure on diffs just yet there prolly 44/60. I got her for $600, not bad for what I NEED like the block/trans/T case for my 408 build this winter. I'd like to rebuild and build while the truck is mobile.

Whats your guy's opinion on towing this thing 90 miles w/ my 86 W150 318 auto? I was planning on running down there this thurs or fri but its going to be in the 90's so I'll probably wait for a cooler weekend. I just want to know if this is to much for the lil teener to handle. I'll be sticking to the back roads at 50mph. I'm worried the motors going to boil over or smoke the trans or over heat the rear end.

I guess I can for once be glad that ND is flat as glass :)...

Thanks, Dustin

 

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i say it depends on the rearend gears. i have a 91 W150 318efi, 518 tranns, 4.56 ls 44/9.25 combo. the trans has the biggest b&m cooler on it. i towed a 88rc about 300 miles on a uhaul auto transporter (heavy ass trailer) running in 3rd gear at 2800rpm (63mph ish) i had no problems. the key is BRAKES on the trailer. without the trailer brakes it would have been nerve racking worring about someone pulling out in front of me. i say go for it.
Brian
 

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snoopy1964 said:
the key is BRAKES on the trailer.
Ditto.

You do not say how you plan on towing it. or what the roads are like,in some cases, highways are better then back roads, because there is less stop and go. Once you are moving, then its not so bad on the truck, its getting going that is hard on the tranny, and stopping that is dangerous on you, and everyone around you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
  I should have been more specific but I didn't want to just ramble on and on. I'll be taking highways not interstate and I'll be using a tow bar not tow rope. I figured the truck will have the big 3/4 ton brakes just not power assisted so braking shouldn't be to bad. I'm just concerned the trans is going to burn itself up in 3rd or the motor going to get hot.

It's 94 now and its 6pm the lows for this weekend are going to be in the 80's. I just don't feel to good about making her tow in 95deg heat :(... I was going to wait for dusk but then I'm pulling at night and that would be more unsafe then any. Breakdown on the side of the road and a drunk doesn't see me and BAMMM both my baby's dead and possibly me and the towwer. I would never forgive myself for being so naive. Trans mission burns up and I say obviously it needed a rebuild, so lets get wrench'n :)....

Thanks for the help so far, i'll be needing some more help later on deciding weather to swap the 44/9.25 for the 44hd/60. Thats a question for another day though, but stay tuned.

Dustin by the way...
 

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What tow bar you using? how you hooking it up? what kind of experience you have? lights for the towed truck?


Hows your trans?

Not knowing anything about you,my concern more is for you, and everyone else's safety, then your trucks transmission. towbars can be dangerous if not done properly, ask any and all questions if you are not sure at all. if you are experienced, then you should understand my concern



BTW, welcome to RCC.  ;)

we want to see some pictures. ;D

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
SuperBurban said:
What tow bar you using? how you hooking it up? what kind of experience you have? lights for the towed truck?

Hows your trans?

Not knowing anything about you,my concern more is for you, and everyone else's safety, then your trucks transmission. towbars can be dangerous if not done properly, ask any and all questions if you are not sure at all. if you are experienced, then you should understand my concern

BTW, welcome to RCC. ;)

we want to see some pictures. ;D
I do understand and appreciate your concern, I have never towed with a bar b4 but I have many times w/rope/chain. The tow bar I'll be using is just a basic A frame design and has a ball receiver on one end w/ 4" ratchet straps and safety cables that hook up and around the bumper. I was planing to put some rubber or hard cardboard between the the straps and bumper as to prevent the strap from getting damaged or severed.

My trans only slips when I really lay on it (hence the reason for the future rebuild). Like when a lay it to the floor in drive (not manual 1st) the 1st to 2nd shift has some serious overlap. Then again I don't plan to pull this thing to the floor and I plan to shift manually. I also will be bringing my battery out of my car for running/tail/hazard lights. I also plan to pull both shafts to prevent burning up the trans. I will also bring along tools,jack,spare :

Thanks for the welcoming and hopefully I'll have some pics soon if everything goes as planed. ;)....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
s ǝoɾ said:
Did you say you are riding along in the towed vehicle as brake man?
No, I don't know were you read that??? Maybe when I was talking about the potential breakdown scenario. When I said quote "Breakdown on the side of the road and a drunk doesn't see me and BAMMM both my baby's dead and possibly me and the towwer(tower)" when I guess I should have said the towie lol. I'll be the lead dog in this adventure :)...
 

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take yout time, plan for extra time, prepare as best you can, have a contingency plan, and go as fast as feels comfortable, which i would say would be no more than the limit and maybe a bit less.  I have towed very long distances with a tow bar, and the things I did to help myself out were to make sure the truck I was towing had good tires, driveshafts disconnected, and the pitman arm or drag link disconnected. 
Let the steering take care of iteslf, and just maintain a safe speed so that you can get the load stopped within a reasonable distance.
Just the basic common sense and plan for the worst.  You'll likely discover some things along the way, and if you have the basic tools and a half way decent tow vehicle...well there isn't much really stopping you except things you can't control.  You'll 'feel' the load and get a good grasp for speed and handling very quickly.  Within the first dfew miles you'll have a pretty good idea how the rest will go.

Plan well and go for it. 

- Sam 
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mad Max said:
take yout time, plan for extra time, prepare as best you can, have a contingency plan, and go as fast as feels comfortable, which i would say would be no more than the limit and maybe a bit less. I have towed very long distances with a tow bar, and the things I did to help myself out were to make sure the truck I was towing had good tires, driveshafts disconnected, and the pitman arm or drag link disconnected.
Let the steering take care of iteslf, and just maintain a safe speed so that you can get the load stopped within a reasonable distance.
Just the basic common sense and plan for the worst. You'll likely discover some things along the way, and if you have the basic tools and a half way decent tow vehicle...well there isn't much really stopping you except things you can't control. You'll 'feel' the load and get a good grasp for speed and handling very quickly. Within the first dfew miles you'll have a pretty good idea how the rest will go.

Plan well and go for it.

- Sam
Thanks sam, I guess I never thought of disconnecting the drag link. You think it would be a big deal if I left it hooked up. Would it want to wonder really bad. I'll have someone in the tuck to steer/brake when needed. I just dont like the idea of now steering

Thanks
 

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MoparFever said:
I'll have someone in the tuck to steer/brake when needed.
Is this even legal where you are???
I have towed a few vehicles in my time with bars and I have never had any one in the towed vehicle.
 

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Why are you towing the second truck back instead of just driving it?

If you question the conditions of the brakes/steering/tires I wouldn't let anyone ride in it, I bet it is illegal to ride in the towed vehicle anyway.  As for the steering the normal caster of the truck will keep it going straight behind you when on the tow bar, and if someone is in it they probubly won't know how to acurately handle the steering and make things worse, when you steer around a corner on a tow bar the towed vehicle will actually steer slightly the wrong direction first to allow for the tail swing off the rear of the tow vehicle this is needed to make everything work together correctly, if a person riding in the second vehicle decides to help you steer around corners they won't follow the exact line needed and can cause the back of the tow vehicle to slide which will quickly end up with both being in a ditch.

I have towed allot of miles with a bunch of different vehicles on a tow bar, first thing is to make a sign "in Tow" for on the back of the towed vehicle to let others know whats going on before they try to pass.  I would also recomend a set of magnetic tow lights they can be picked up for $20 at harbor freight tools and are well worth the money to have tail light on the towed vehicle that work.
 

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MoparFever said:
Thanks sam, I guess I never thought of disconnecting the drag link. You think it would be a big deal if I left it hooked up. Would it want to wonder really bad. I'll have someone in the tuck to steer/brake when needed. I just dont like the idea of now steering

Thanks
no no, the steering (of the truck you're towing) will take care of itself - the reason I mention disconnecting the drag link is so that there isn't the whole steering system 'involved'. In other words, you want the tow'd truck to be free and clear of any possibilities of its own steering causing a bad tracking problem. If the front end is 'free' then it'll track wherever it is pointed.
It is possible that a bad enough bump could get the tires clocked adversely to the direction you're going but it should 'right' itself quickly. The tow'd trucks' steering will track just like the truck was driving itself, and if disconnected from the gear box/column then it has nothing in those two parts to slow down how fast it corrects.

I don't think it'd be a real big deal to leave it connected, but just be sure the column is key'd so the column locking mechanism dowsn't lock the steering shaft...and prevent the steering from turning at all. Plus I personally don't like to cycle the hydraulics of the steering system back and forth without the pump turning (engine on).

- Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
DodgeMudder said:
Why are you towing the second truck back instead of just driving it?

If you question the conditions of the brakes/steering/tires I wouldn't let anyone ride in it, I bet it is illegal to ride in the towed vehicle anyway. As for the steering the normal caster of the truck will keep it going straight behind you when on the tow bar, and if someone is in it they probubly won't know how to acurately handle the steering and make things worse, when you steer around a corner on a tow bar the towed vehicle will actually steer slightly the wrong direction first to allow for the tail swing off the rear of the tow vehicle this is needed to make everything work together correctly, if a person riding in the second vehicle decides to help you steer around corners they won't follow the exact line needed and can cause the back of the tow vehicle to slide which will quickly end up with both being in a ditch.

I have towed allot of miles with a bunch of different vehicles on a tow bar, first thing is to make a sign "in Tow" for on the back of the towed vehicle to let others know whats going on before they try to pass. I would also recomend a set of magnetic tow lights they can be picked up for $20 at harbor freight tools and are well worth the money to have tail light on the towed vehicle that work.
I would drive it back but it hasn't been running in 5 years and needs a starter or flywheel. I'm a lil tight for money right now and planed to just get a battery for lights. Does harbor freight have towing signs too? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
pir2 said:
Is this even legal where you are???
I have towed a few vehicles in my time with bars and I have never had any one in the towed vehicle.
You make a very good point on the legal aspect, I guess I was thinking it would easier to turn around or stop short with somebody at the wheel. State trooper might not see it that way though {dont}.

EDIT: I actualy just called the MN state patrol office and the deputy told me that it would be fine to have a secondary driver. Thanks for the "out side the box" thinking though.
 

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MoparFever said:
You make a very good point on the legal aspect, I guess I was thinking it would easier to turn around or stop short with somebody at the wheel. State trooper might not see it that way though {dont}.

EDIT: I actualy just called the MN state patrol office and the deputy told me that it would be fine to have a secondary driver. Thanks for the "out side the box" thinking though.
I would call again, and still not recommend doing that. if that becomes disconnected, there is no way he can react fast enough to avoid any type of accident. there is very little that a person in the towed vehicle can do to assist.

Every law I have seen, concerning passengers in a trailer (yes, that is considered a trailer), require a king pin connection for the trailer, and a two way communications device between the two vehicles.

Mad Max said:
no no, the steering (of the truck you're towing) will take care of itself - the reason I mention disconnecting the drag link is so that there isn't the whole steering system 'involved'. In other words, you want the tow'd truck to be free and clear of any possibilities of its own steering causing a bad tracking problem. If the front end is 'free' then it'll track wherever it is pointed.
It is possible that a bad enough bump could get the tires clocked adversely to the direction you're going but it should 'right' itself quickly. The tow'd trucks' steering will track just like the truck was driving itself, and if disconnected from the gear box/column then it has nothing in those two parts to slow down how fast it corrects.

I don't think it'd be a real big deal to leave it connected, but just be sure the column is key'd so the column locking mechanism dowsn't lock the steering shaft...and prevent the steering from turning at all. Plus I personally don't like to cycle the hydraulics of the steering system back and forth without the pump turning (engine on).

- Sam
I've flat towed Dodge trucks all over the place, including from Pa. to Co., last summer, and never disconnected the steering.The only problem I've had, was towing a lifted truck from NJ, that was not even close to having any caster, another reason why I dislike lifted trucks.

Mad Max said:
It is possible that a bad enough bump could get the tires clocked adversely to the direction you're going
Maybe the steering gear & hydraulics act like a steering Stabilizer, and that's why I've never encountered those types of problems. ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mad Max said:
no no, the steering (of the truck you're towing) will take care of itself - the reason I mention disconnecting the drag link is so that there isn't the whole steering system 'involved'. In other words, you want the tow'd truck to be free and clear of any possibilities of its own steering causing a bad tracking problem. If the front end is 'free' then it'll track wherever it is pointed.
It is possible that a bad enough bump could get the tires clocked adversely to the direction you're going but it should 'right' itself quickly. The tow'd trucks' steering will track just like the truck was driving itself, and if disconnected from the gear box/column then it has nothing in those two parts to slow down how fast it corrects.

I don't think it'd be a real big deal to leave it connected, but just be sure the column is key'd so the column locking mechanism dowsn't lock the steering shaft...and prevent the steering from turning at all. Plus I personally don't like to cycle the hydraulics of the steering system back and forth without the pump turning (engine on).

- Sam
I learned the steering lock the hard way when my budy needed a tow. Everything was good until we had to take a left out of the parking lot all I could here was errrrrrrrrr err er er er er er er er. I stoped and just looked at him like he was a total dumb ass cuz I knew what had happend lol. This guy won't be my driver either so don't worry this was back when I was 16.
 

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I've had less problems pulling with a tow bar than with a dolly.  This truck will be to wide for a dolly (my opinion) so that wouldn't even be an option.

I've never pulled the steering but I can see some advantages.  On the other hand, I think the steering system will help as a shock absorber.  If these guys with a motor home having 15 feet of rear overhang can pull a vehicle on a tow bar, there shouldn't be any problem with this gig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I guess I'm more concerned for the transmission than anything else right now. But I think I'm a go pick it up tomorrow afternoon. Wish me luck thanks 8)
 
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