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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.high-tec-retreading.com/

About 3500 miles ago, I bought a set of retread tires from High Tec for my Jeep Cherokee. My Jeep is my commuter most of the time, and seldom goes off road, so I bought the AT tread pattern. 4 235/75R15 tires, including shipping, was $210 total. I ordered them on a Friday, the next Monday was a holiday, and I still had the tires by the following Thursday. The tires were all built with matching Michelin carcasses.

I had them mounted at a local 4x4 shop, and paid careful attention to the amount of weight needed to balance them. On factory Jeep aluminum rims, the worst wheel took 6 oz, the best took no weight at all. The shop owner was a bit leery of retreads, but like most people who say this, he had no personal experience with them. Retreads have a bad reputation primarily because of cheap cold capped tires that sometimes seperate. These tires are not cold capped, they are revulcanized, so seperation isn't more of a worry on these than it is a new tire, in my opinion.

Now, price isn't everything, how do they perform? Quite good, actually. Again, this Jeep is mostly on-road, so wet pavement was a big consideration. This tires stick to the road wet or dry. In a heavy rain, the Jeep used to fishtail on a certain steep and twisty hill if I were accelerating on one of the turns. It no longer does this. Wet weather braking is smooth and the tires do not hydroplane. Most AT tread patterns don't have much road noise, and these are no exception. There is a slight whine from 20-30mph, which dissappears over 30mph and doesn't return at any legal speed. You can hear them hum a bit once you creep over 80mph, though.

I have no doubt that these tires are going to last quite awhile, too. The first 3500 mile have hardly touched them. The warranty was either 20,000 or 25,000 miles on tread life, but I think that's going to be pretty conservative for these.

Now, as far as the company itself goes, they were very helpful. I e-mailed them with a couple of questions, and they responded within 24 hours. When I talked to them on the phone, they were friendly and efficient. I've already mentioned that the tires were shipped quickly. A pleasure to do business with.

I am very happy with these tires, and won't hesitate to order them again when the need arises. They are good tires at an outstanding price. They are supposed to be coming out with 35" and 37" tires soon, but don't have them at the moment, so I haven't considered them for my Dodge yet.
 
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I have looked at this company and corresponded through e-mails with them about the same tires except in teh 31" size. I have been very impressed with the compnay so far and will be buying some of these also when the need arises. I would have bought some already but I had just bought some new tires when I was led to this company. My wifes new, used, Exploder will be needing tires soon and it is getting a set of these.

Chris
 
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if you say people who dislike re-treads have no experiance with them......... take a ride down interstate 95 and start counting tire chunks.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bill- said:
if you say people who dislike re-treads have no experiance with them......... take a ride down interstate 95 and start counting tire chunks.....
Bill, the tires that chunk and make the little black alligators are recapped, aka cold capped tires. Those tires have the remaining tread ground off, and then a new layer of tread is glued to the carcass. No heat is applied, and the tire is not revulcanized. The only thing holding on the tread is adhesive. When those tires are ran underinflated, which causes heat to build up, the glue lets go and the tire flies apart. A recapped tire is cheaper than an actually revulcanized retread tire, but is not as well made and requires the drive to check the pressure more often. Trucking companies, and the NHTSA, know this, so those tires are used on the dual wheels where they won't cause loss of control if they let go. Even recaps have a low failure rate, think of how many trucks go down that stretch of road, eh?

But, the tires I reviewed are not cold capped, so those road side chunks really have no bearing on the tires in the review. The guy who mounted them for me also mentioned the chunking, which is why I said that people who dislike retreads have no experience with them.

Quality retreads are revulcanized, and that is what makes them different than a recap, or cold cap. The tread is chemically bonded to the carcass and is in no more danger of chunking than a factory new tire. Just so you know, a "factory new" tire also vulcanizes the tread to the carcass. In other words, a company like Hi-Tech-Retreading uses the exact same process as a new tire manufacturer once the carcass is prepped. www.tirefailures.com has a .pdf file of the process of making a new tire. Download it and compare it to the process as explained on the hi-tech web site, and see for yourself.

My grandfather was a heavy equipment operator, and also cut timber and ran a 110 acre farm. At various time he also owned a service station and a small fleet of trucks. He ran retreads for decades on log trucks, grain trucks, wreckers, and his personal trucks. I don't think my grandfather ever bought a new tire for anything but his Lincolns.

None of them ever chunked. He had 4 decades (early 1950s - 1992) of driving everything from IHC grain trucks to Ford 3/4 tons, and he did not have a single chunked tire, not one tread seperatation. My father and I own a construction company, which we started about 9 years ago. With the exception of two trucks, one still on the original rubber and one on a set of Michelins I gave him off of my old personal truck, the tool trucks run retreads. No tread seperations. Three generations of my family have used retreads successfully for over 50 years, primarily because we paid the extra money for true retreads and not cold capped tires.

I stand by my statement that those who dislike retreads have no experience with them. Every bad thing I've heard about retreads has been based solely on seeing the alligators along the road, and not from experience.
 

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Thought I'd throw in my 2 pennies. I ordered the OTR mud 31x10.5x15 tires for my 88 RC. I specified the Michelin carcasses and that is what I recieved 10 days after ordering. I took them down to local tire shop and had them mounted. I watched most of the mounting and balancing. 2 of them took almost 12 oz and the other two took 5-6 oz. The guys at the shop laughed at them telling me they had never used so much lead. I went for a short highway drive of about 12 miles and they ride about as I expected. Road noise starts being noticable at 40 mph with them getting noisy at 65+ mph. This is OK with me but the amount of balance lead seems high. I e-mailed Hi Tech and they said that was high but if they run ok not to worry. This is not the same tire you had but thought I'd tell of my experience.
 

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big jim said:
Why bother with that crap. I have not checked lately but a 31-10.5-15 tire can't be that much green. I'd find some used tires before I would buy recaps.
As Hung said, there is a difference between re-caps and re-treads. There is ALSO a difference between $45 or so per tire, and $100 -150!
 
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big jim said:
Why bother with that crap. I have not checked lately but a 31-10.5-15 tire can't be that much green. I'd find some used tires before I would buy recaps.
There's a huge difference between re-caps and re-treads. The ones being reviewed here are re-treads. I will run re-treads and I intend to get a set of these about the first week in February and will add my opinion to this thread at that time.

Chris
 

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any one who realy wants these let me know the foctory is only about 1 hour from me I can always drive down and look at them or even pick them up and mail them out Via UPs more them likely from cheaper tham he can mail them to you.

Scott
 

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Terraplane said:
Thought I'd throw in my 2 pennies. I ordered the OTR mud 31x10.5x15 tires for my 88 RC. I specified the Michelin carcasses and that is what I recieved 10 days after ordering. I took them down to local tire shop and had them mounted. I watched most of the mounting and balancing. 2 of them took almost 12 oz and the other two took 5-6 oz. The guys at the shop laughed at them telling me they had never used so much lead. I went for a short highway drive of about 12 miles and they ride about as I expected. Road noise starts being noticable at 40 mph with them getting noisy at 65+ mph. This is OK with me but the amount of balance lead seems high. I e-mailed Hi Tech and they said that was high but if they run ok not to worry. This is not the same tire you had but thought I'd tell of my experience.
the balance problem could of also been wheel related. Or just incompetent people balancing the tires. I have seen tire guys put a ton of lead to balance a tire only to have a senior come over rip it off and balance it out with 1/4 of lead it took the other guys.
 

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I have seen the same as sam. Had tires balanced at a local station, took twice the weight as it did when I had them rebalanced at Sears a week later. On the High Tecs I am on my third set and love them. Just wish they had more sizes. the only complaint is I've had two with Michelin sidewalls and both started cracking like dry rot after about a year. The Goodyear sidewalls held up great.
 

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good info
 

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a freind of mine had these on his cherokee. #1 they said they were 235\75\15s but they rubbed constantly just going down the road. #2 from day one he had a really bad vibration. no matter what he could not get r id of the vibration untill he replaced them. thats his reveiw of em. i just posted it
 

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Shit! I've had brand spanking new tires do that. That ain't nothing man. Also, tire sizes vary from what is advertised to what it actually translates into. I had a set of 33" tires (mud kings) that were actually 34" tall. And were his tires cold capped or were they made with the process mentioned here?
 

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i just recieved my set of 315/75/16 mud i will lt everyone know how they preform
 

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So has anyone run them offroad, airdown and put throw the paces?
I was looking at the Mud D for $430 all 4 with shipping
Do they get very good traction for mud or rocks?
 

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HungWeiLo said:
Bill- said:
if you say people who dislike re-treads have no experiance with them......... take a ride down interstate 95 and start counting tire chunks.....
Bill, the tires that chunk and make the little black alligators are recapped, aka cold capped tires. Those tires have the remaining tread ground off, and then a new layer of tread is glued to the carcass. No heat is applied, and the tire is not revulcanized. The only thing holding on the tread is adhesive. When those tires are ran underinflated, which causes heat to build up, the glue lets go and the tire flies apart. A recapped tire is cheaper than an actually revulcanized retread tire, but is not as well made and requires the drive to check the pressure more often. Trucking companies, and the NHTSA, know this, so those tires are used on the dual wheels where they won't cause loss of control if they let go. Even recaps have a low failure rate, think of how many trucks go down that stretch of road, eh?

But, the tires I reviewed are not cold capped, so those road side chunks really have no bearing on the tires in the review. The guy who mounted them for me also mentioned the chunking, which is why I said that people who dislike retreads have no experience with them.

Quality retreads are revulcanized, and that is what makes them different than a recap, or cold cap. The tread is chemically bonded to the carcass and is in no more danger of chunking than a factory new tire. Just so you know, a "factory new" tire also vulcanizes the tread to the carcass. In other words, a company like Hi-Tech-Retreading uses the exact same process as a new tire manufacturer once the carcass is prepped. www.tirefailures.com has a .pdf file of the process of making a new tire. Download it and compare it to the process as explained on the hi-tech web site, and see for yourself.

My grandfather was a heavy equipment operator, and also cut timber and ran a 110 acre farm. At various time he also owned a service station and a small fleet of trucks. He ran retreads for decades on log trucks, grain trucks, wreckers, and his personal trucks. I don't think my grandfather ever bought a new tire for anything but his Lincolns.

None of them ever chunked. He had 4 decades (early 1950s - 1992) of driving everything from IHC grain trucks to Ford 3/4 tons, and he did not have a single chunked tire, not one tread seperatation. My father and I own a construction company, which we started about 9 years ago. With the exception of two trucks, one still on the original rubber and one on a set of Michelins I gave him off of my old personal truck, the tool trucks run retreads. No tread seperations. Three generations of my family have used retreads successfully for over 50 years, primarily because we paid the extra money for true retreads and not cold capped tires.

I stand by my statement that those who dislike retreads have no experience with them. Every bad thing I've heard about retreads has been based solely on seeing the alligators along the road, and not from experience.
they work fin in lite trucks and cars but a smart truck driver wont use them and in fact are illegal to use on steer tires. and all retreds are vulcanised cold capping wouldnt work..not long enough for it to be usefull anyways
 

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Does anybody know what the speed limit is on the muds?
 

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needaram said:
Does anybodyknow what the speed limit is on the muds?
Not sure, but they won't be higher than a Q speed rating (99mph). It might not even have a speed rating, meaning less than 89mph.
 

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weighing in as a licened tire man, with over 10 years experience with a bandag retreader i can tell you that while it almost complete true that retreads aren't what you see on the road side it still happens.

the number one cause for failure in any tire is heat, being run under inflated due to lack of maintenance or due to a puncture. a new, used, hot or cold capped tire will let go. as for the aligators you would need to look at them up close to tell if it from a hot cap or a cold cap. even a professionaly retreaded tire, properly maintained will aligator in given cirrcumstances.

we don't have many companied up here any more that are cold caping but the amount of rubber on the side of the road is still the same.

no slag to the big riggers here but most drivers don't check their tires often enough and then BANG and we get a call to go out and throw one on at rush hour on the side of the highway.

for the most part the good retreaders have spent the cash to stay current with all the lastest equipment to properly evaluate and check over the cassing they get in before they get to the retreading process. the test include eletrical resistance where the cassing is mounted on a machine that rotates over a copper plate while copper chains are hung inside and a current is passed through the tire. low resistance indicates a injury to the steel cords and structure of the tire. more and more ultra sound is taking the place of resistance testing. age and type of cassing are important. overall condition is important, wheather or not the tire has been capped and how many times is important. the proper prep by a well trained individual all done the line is critical. and making sure that the tire is properly maintained is all part of ensuring that a retread preforms like a new tire.

just like there are varying degrees of quality in new tires there are varying degrees of quality in retreads. the steer tires that are sent in for their first cap are ussualy retreaded with premium hyway paterns ussualy drives, second rate steers will go imedialtly to the premium trailer patterns. premuim drives will ussualy go to the premuim trail pattern, premuim trailer and lower quality drives will go for trailer, good quality drives and lower quality steers will go for various drive tread patterns. if a tire makes it around to the second or third time it will only go for trailer and drive patterns where the tires where life expectencie is not high such as bulk/large trailer garbage haulers, yard vehicles etc......... this is just a broad overview so don't quote me.

people need to know that retreading is really a high tech buss. and should be prepared to seek out the better operators.

tom the tireman
 
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