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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
whats everyones opinon?

i think they will both do the same thing
fuses are more readily avaible

i am doing the amp gauge bypass today and i have inline fuse holders rated at 30 amps

that should be ok .right?

and what size fuse should be used to go thru the bulk connector? [dash area]
should i use 30 for the alt to the bat?
 

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I am sure opinions will vary. I have always used an inline fuse in place of a fusible link and have never had any problems-I am sure others will disagree.
 

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I have also replaced my fuse links with fuses and self-resetting circuit breakers (breaker bewteen alt & batt, fuses on IGN1, IGN2, Lights and Hazards). The only problems I have is I can no longer jump-start other vehicles...it blows the breaker. Highest amperage breaker I can find is a 40 amp, and with the alt putting out 120+ amps under load (like jumpstarting) it justs frys the breaker. No more jump starting for me :-\ Otherwise I have had no problems with the fuses.

'87 is right though, it is not recommended to change fuse links with fuses. Fuse links are 'slow blowing'--IE they will tolerate voltage spikes for a few seconds and not blow out. A fuse will blow the instant it's amperage rating is exceeded.

-SM
 

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An inline fuse is NOT a good idea, especially in a high current circuit such as the main supply to your whole electrical system.
I reccommend buying the "tech is made simple" book from: www.madelectrical.com
In there he explains that fusable links are your friends. He shows examples of how a small amount of resistence at a connection (like were an inline fuse snaps in), in a high current carrying circuit, will get hot enough to melt the fuse holder and even melt the solder that holds the fuse element to end caps!.
When installed properly (crimped AND soldered), a fusable link has no chance of getting any appreciable resistence. They are flexible and very reliable. If you are having problems with burning fusable links, you have other issues, the fusable link just did its job and saved your system!
With some lower current and less important circuits, you could get away with using and inline fuse, but don't do it on your main power wire to your whole vehicle.
Also, 30 amps is too small, especially since at the minimum, your alternator is a 60 amp.
 

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I've read some on this topic, including MAD's book, and haven't really made up my mind yet on what I think. As far as saving a system, a properly sized fuse blowing fast couldn't hurt the system over a slow blow fusible link I'd think. Could be an annoyance though.

While re-doing some previous owner's wiring, I finally figured out what one line and fuse was for. Can't remember now, but it was bypassing a burnt fusible link. Looked up some color codes and it said 18 ga. Dang small, but I tried it. Got hot real fast. Put in a better (than he had) bypass with a blade type fuse and have never had any problems. Doesn't mean I won't in the future, but have had no problems for a couple years with it. Mostly skipped trying other fusible links due to being too lazy to run for parts again and I had everything else I needed to fuse it.
 

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KThaxton said:
An inline fuse is NOT a good idea, especially in a high current circuit such as the main supply to your whole electrical system.
I reccommend buying the "tech is made simple" book from: www.madelectrical.com
In there he explains that fusable links are your friends. He shows examples of how a small amount of resistence at a connection (like were an inline fuse snaps in), in a high current carrying circuit, will get hot enough to melt the fuse holder and even melt the solder that holds the fuse element to end caps!.
When installed properly (crimped AND soldered), a fusable link has no chance of getting any appreciable resistence. They are flexible and very reliable. If you are having problems with burning fusable links, you have other issues, the fusable link just did its job and saved your system!
With some lower current and less important circuits, you could get away with using and inline fuse, but don't do it on your main power wire to your whole vehicle.
Also, 30 amps is too small, especially since at the minimum, your alternator is a 60 amp.
Have to agree with KT - I've read Marks book (madelectrical), and talked to him on the phone, I would say that he knows what he's talking about. It not that hard to do fusable links, and to make and carry spares.
my 02
 

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What amperage can a 14/16/18 gauge fusible link carry? I've had a new one shrival the casing before blowing (16 gauge), how safe is that.
My preferences lie with the blade fuses, especially when trouble shooting a known short in the fusible link circuit. You can see when the fuse is blown, unlike the link setup.
 

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fun2mud said:
What amperage can a 14/16/18 gauge fusible link carry? I've had a new one shrival the casing before blowing (16 gauge), how safe is that.
My preferences lie with the blade fuses, especially when trouble shooting a known short in the fusible link circuit. You can see when the fuse is blown, unlike the link setup.
I don't know the amperage capacity equivelent on a fusable link, but you use a particular size based on what size wire you are protecting. The general rule of thumb is to use a fusable link that is 4 sizes smaller than the wire you are protecting.
Example:
10 awg wire, use 14 awg fusable link
12 awg wire, use 16 awg fusable link

The easiest way to test if a fusable link is bad, is to pull on it lightly, if its blown, it will stretch like a rubber band.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i will be using fusable links / i have only had 2 go bad in 20 years
i wasn't having any trouble with blowing fusable links .

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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I always assumed a fusible link can handle whatever load a standard wire of that size and length could carry. Don't know if that helps any though as I don't know what a standard wire could carry either. I've seen guidance charts for load capability based on size and length, but can't remember where right now.

if I remember right, MAD recommends about 6" length for the fusible links
 

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5 to 6 inches long for the fusible links.

Regarding the other debate between fusible links vs. fuses, I would say fusible links in the engine compartment and inline fuses in the cockpit.

Mac

harvester said:
i will be doing this amp bypass http://www.madelectrical.com/electricaltech/amp-gauges.shtml
i got new fusable wire 2.0 mm for the alt. wire... how long does it need to be?
for the wire to the dash 0.8 mm will this be large enough ?
parts store was out of 16 gauge
 

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Harvester,

Regarding the type of protection you need using fusible links:


18ga. Fusible Link
protects 14ga. or heavier wired systems



16ga. Fusible Link
protects 12ga. or heavier wired systems



14ga. Fusible Link
protects 10ga. or heavier wired systems



12ga. Fusible Link
protects 8ga. or heavier wired systems


 

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macario said:
5 to 6 inches long for the fusible links.

Regarding the other debate between fusible links vs. fuses, I would say fusible links in the engine compartment and inline fuses in the cockpit.

Mac
I agree with this. I installed a fuse block in the harsh environment of the engine compartment and the connections to the fuse legs corroded. This is not an issue with fusable links.
 

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Right - about 5 - 6" is the right lenght.
 
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