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OK got a 1.25" TC case drop in. I have a 4" drop shackle and 5.5" lift on the spring. I actually had my front driveshaft extend to make up for this. This did not work because the CV joint binds up at one point and is about an inch above making the axle yolk. Clearance (grinding) at point of contact in the CV is not going to give me enough angle without taking all the strengh away from it. ( Dana 44 front axle by the way)

OK now I have been told by Sam and a couple of guys that the way to go is a CV-less driveshaft. I have jacked up the body all the way and it looks like this will work for me (allthough it is real close.) The big question is the TC drop made the angle at the TC point up a litlle. If I have a CV-less driveshaft made up I am concerned about the top angle binding at the TC case yolk. Also about the high angle of this point. Are there U-joints that are made for crappy angles? I am not a driveshaft guy and this is the first time I have done anything like this so some info would be great. I think I might have just convinced myself this will work just fine as I write this but would love a second voice of support or concern. Thnaks for taking the time.

Mike

After writing the above and going to Drivetrain Industires here in Denver it is true that the whole straight axle will hit my TC support almost at rest and definetly when flexed. I would like to keep this cheap but now it is looking like a high angle CV is maybe the way to go. I am buying a house and got a kid on the way so cash is tight but I will justify having 4wd again cause snow is just around the corner. Here is a link to the pic of the angle. I know it looks like it might do it but trust me not with a 2-3 inch driveshaft. Thanks
Mike
http://atlas.walagata.com/w/mikewiz/Frontdrive.jpg
 

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The idea of going CV-less is you get a slightly longer driveshaft and less bind. However it depends on the size of the u-joint series you want to run. A 1350 series joint has more strength than a 1310 series joint. A 1410 series joint has greater strength than both, but because it is a physically larger joint that takes up more space in the yoke, the joint can't operate at a high angle without binding on the yokes.

There are high angle CV joints that are available online, some have up to an 80 degree working angle. Something like this is ideal for a PT 4wd front drivetrain, but you still have to deal with the joint at the axle end.

There are still some options. One idea going around is to go with another high angle CV at the axle end. Yes it can get rather expensive.

You'll need to really do some searching and experimenting. Not all yokes are created equally. Some yokes have more room for the u-joint and these will not bind as much. You will need to allow for more angle for suspension articulation.

Another option is difficult. This requires that you cut the knuckles off of the axle tube, turn them, and weld them back on, so that the pumpkin is more inline with the driveshaft. Whatever you do, do not use shims or wedges to turn the axle, as this will turn the knuckles, creating negative caster. Too much negative caster will create all kinds of handling problems with the truck's steering.

Your final option is to clock the transfer case. There are kits for these, for other trucks. I don't know if one exists for the RC. If there isn't one, you may need the services of a machine shop.

While you didn't mention the rear driveshaft, I thought I'd make a few remarks about the rear. In a part time 4wd, the front axle isn't used often or at highway speeds, so you don't have to be concerned with high operating angles at the joints. The rear is another issue. If you have a high working angle at the rear driveshaft, your CV joint is going to live a much shorter life. A high angle is not only more susceptible to vibration, but the joint will create much more heat. It's the heat that ruins CVs and u-joints. To make matters worse, they don't hold much grease. With heat, the little grease there is, breaks down and the trunnions and needle bearings go dry. You should step up your preventive maintence and grease the CV's and u-joints often with a high temp grease.

Ed
 

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Shimming the axle to add a few degrees is definately WRONG on the front. Like RXT said, all kinds of steering problems. The thought occurred the solution would be to turn the upper/lower ball joint mounts and the spring purches. Move them the amount of degrees you needed to keep your turning angle straight.
Really that would be a custom front axle but it should solve this common problem.
 

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I had 10" of suspension lift and cut down a stock rear driveshaft and used it for the font. I broke outer axle shafts and ujoints on the front axle, but never had a problem with my front driveshaft of the ujoints in it. BTW, I wheel hard too :) I had 40x17 ground hawgs and a big block, so there was alot of moving and stress, obviously the front driveshaft ujoiints where stronger (or less strained) then the ones in the front axle or the outershafts in the front axle.
 
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