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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A series of videos from Gale Banks, looking at the different styles, lube flow, fill, aeration, ect.

I disagree with him saying you do not need to raise each side, to be sure lube gets to each hub. But maybe he is only discussing the AAM axle. Either way, it is a interesting demonstration. And of course, the conclusion will be that his cover is the best. ::)

 

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agreed !! both hubs need to have oil in them , easy to do , before tires are back on with a jack before it even leaves the shop .
 

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Yeah, I watched that series some time ago and my own conclusions were; by the time that series ends, Mr. Banks will come up with a cover that provides a very small dynamic flow advantage over those other covers at twice the cost of the most expensive cover tested. He's looking for new markets to exploit,,,nothing wrong with that alone, but his products have always been more costly compared to the competition. Words of advice to Mr. Banks, I think you have a few great products, but not for the price.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Its not whether a product is good or bad, works or not, better, or worse, but its all in the marketing.
 

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SuperBurban said:
Its not whether a product is good or bad, works or not, better, or worse, but its all in the marketing.
For me, marketing is fine, but as to wether I buy it or not, it's all in the price.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree, I'm not a believer in much of the aftermarket stuff. Looking forward to see if he publishes the temp charts he shows in the one vid.
 

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To me, price sort of matters, but what really matters to me is value.  I don't mind paying a higher price for a good product.  Anyone who can cut metal can make a differential cover, but if it's a piece of junk that's no better than what I can do in my driveway, then there isn't really much savings in it. 

I don't go for the whole cooling aspect of some differential covers since I don't really tow anything, but a heavy duty cover that can take a good hit from a rock is something that I like.  Now that doesn't mean I am willing to shell out $200 for a Crane D60 cover, since I think that is overkill for my needs and way too much money.  On the other hand, a Solid brand cover for $65 would be more my speed and plenty of protection over a stock stamped cover for what I do.  Just my .02
 

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deathrowdave said:
OEM fronts are heavier material than rear OEM Dana 60 covers .
I wonder if that doesn't vary though since I know both of mine are basically identical, though both are older. The part numbers for the replacement covers through Mopar are all the same, front or rear for most years and change in '89 and the '90s. Possibly due to the Cummins models. Spicer lists a couple different part numbers for the front D60s through the years and a couple different ones for the rear D60s. So there are obviously some differences but I really have to wonder why they have so many different covers. There is 4 different covers for D60 axles from '78-'93 while Mopar, and the aftermarket for that matter, only supply one cover for all of them.
 

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Why cant a cover be designed to increase cooling AND protect the diff?Not all fast driving is done on pavement.
 

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I'm patently waiting for the Dyno to get repaired and the series conclusion being uploaded, well and to see what design he starts marketing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm thinking the results were not as expected, and they are stalling.
 

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The largest problem I see with covers is that the lube fill port is too high. Which ends up expelling the fluid hopefully through the vent. I would think extra capacity at the proper level would be superior in cooling than a simple finned cover. I am not an engineer and I am not going to run the tests that he does.
 

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when you whip up cooling/lubercating oils , you entrap air bubbles , that retain heat , so you do not want to be constantly whipping the oil , same effect as overfilling the engine oil , and having the crank splashing it ..
 

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I get that. A diff cover that allows more fluid at the same level is better than one that holds more at a higher level is what I would assume.
 

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Diff lube is constantly being aerated, even at stock levels, due to the fact that the gears dip down into the lube.  If it were like an engine with a wet sump, pump and oil passages to pump oil directly to where it is needed, it would not need to be this way, but since it relies on splash oiling that the ring gear throws around, the lube is going to get air bubbles and a certain amount of foaming.  Same with a manual transmission, they rely on the fluid level being high enough for the gears and oil slingers to carry the lube up to the gears and bearings that are not in the lube.  A higher lube capacity means more fluid to absorb and dissipate the heat the gears and bearings generate and it can help keep the axle bearings oiled better.
 

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look closer at a diff casting , you'll see the passages directing the oil , to the pinion bearing,  now take an egg beater , put only the tip of it in the eggs , then dip it in all the way , and you'll see how much the amount of aeration changes . The oil needs to be carried up and run down as oil not foam . Foam holds heat , and dirt . There is a proper level to which the gears are immersed .  overfilling your splash lubed lawnmower engine causes problems too .
 

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I'm very familiar with the inside of the various axle housings used in most Mopar and off road applications.  A lot of the fabricated housings used in drag and off road racing do not use any passages for oiling.  Also, there is a pretty big difference between crankshaft counterweights and rods smacking the oil and a ring gear and differential running in it.  It's very common in the off road world to run the diffs filled quite a bit more than normal and there aren't any issues from it.  In some cases with extreme pinion angles, overfilling the diff is the only way the pinion gets decent lube.
 

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Likely no issue due to the fact that offroading you get shirt bursts of high rpm of the gear set.  On the highway you're running hard for longer than a short burst.
 
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