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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay well im back askin questions again. Im looking at having a read drive shaft built for my W200. Since my engine and transmission are 52" long and then with the divorced t-case being almost behind the cab. And going with a 4 inch lift. Im wondering if i should use a Cv style rear shaft. If its possible or a waste of my time.
 

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No dude your barking up the right tree. I am about in the same spot you are. mine is a short box with a divorced case too and my angle is hella bad. The only reason y mine is still in there is b/c i am waiting to swap out my rear axle, once that happends I will be getting a c/v style driveshaft. They are pricey but worth it. Good building! ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My main concern is the diesel tearing to cv joint apart, since im plannin on doin some competition pulls and pulling a 27ft boat and stuff like that.
 

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Use the big CV shafts that places like High Angle Driveline sell rather than the recycled front shaft parts. It will cost you out the nose, but it may be worth it if you have angle issues. I'd be sure you need it though, since they are expensive for the new yokes and all.

Also, why is your transfer case so far back? On a stock divorced case truck the transfer case is just about where the door handles are. You can see the silhouette of the square bottom of the NP205 here under the door:



Are you using a full length 2WD transmission? How long is your front shaft and did you need a carrier bearing in it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay well i ended up measuring all wrong somewhere i added a extra foot in there. The engine and trans will be about 60" long plus 1' for the stub shaft and about 6" from the radiator support witht he 4 inch thick radiator. IM estimating a total of about 78" from the front of the radiator support to the output of the t-case.

After going out and remeasuring I might be able to get away with using the stock rear shaft or having it shortened a couple inches. Im still waiting for the transmission to get back from the rebuilder so the measurement on the transmission isnt exact and yes its a full length 2wd tranny.
 

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if you are going to do pulling, that shaft will explode sooner than later.

i'd try to drop the case a bit and move stuff around keeping the standard rear shaft.
 

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I got my CV rear drive shaft from Jesse at HighAngle. Great product. Remember if you are using a CV rear shaft the pinion should point directly to the CV.
 

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NMike said:
if you are going to do pulling, that shaft will explode sooner than later.
Maybe but it's going to take some pretty hefty pulling to destroy one of these bad boys:



These use Spicer 1350 joints.
 

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It's not mine.  I swiped that pic from High Angle's website.  I wish I could afford to swap to those shifts right now, lol.
 

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I had a pair of High Angle CV/1410 drive shafts made for my RC about 18 months ago.  They are beautiful - quality construction, solidly built.  Although they were not cheap  :eek:, you certainly get what you pay for and in this case you will not be disappointed.  Jesse is a stand up guy, returned my call quickly when I left him voice mail, and had the driveshafts built and shipped to me faster than expected.  He also had everything in stock that I needed to connect the 1410 u-joints to my D60s which made the install easy.
 

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DavidO2007 said:
Okay well im back askin questions again. Im looking at having a read drive shaft built for my W200. Since my engine and transmission are 52" long and then with the divorced t-case being almost behind the cab. And going with a 4 inch lift. Im wondering if i should use a Cv style rear shaft. If its possible or a waste of my time.
I have an 83 Ramcharger so you know it's short was going through U-joints every 6 months just did a rear shackle flip has about 7 inch's of lift and the drive shaft is sitting almost staight with the diff was thinking about CV my self but not any more
 

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If you have angled your rear axle, you have taken the U0joints out of sync.  The angle of both the yoke on the transfer case and the yoke on the axle have to be at the same angle, +/- a few degrees.  If your axle pinion is pointed inline with the driveshaft, that would be an ideal time to swap to a CV shaft as that is what they require with little to no angle on the single U-joint.
 

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something i've been thinking about, im pretty sure that all u joints need to have some angle they cannot be straight so how does this work out with a cv rear shaft. i've been trying to find some good info on u joint theory but havent found much. im aware that using a single u joint at each end you need to have the yokes on the same plane to get corresponding angles and that they need to be in phase all so that one cancels the others vibration. then what im wondering is how does a shaft with 2 joints on one end and 1 on the other cancel the vibrations if they arent on corresponding angles? i figured it could be discussed here because it actually pertains to the original question of when is a cv shaft needed and when is it not. most people i talked to know nothing about how u joints actually work so i figured i'd ask the experts
 

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A U-joint can run with no angle with no problems but usually due to varying weight on the rear from fuel and cargo, there normally is a degree or two anyway.  For more info, check out the driveshaft manuals on the Dana site.
 

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To be set up correctly, the rear axle pinion should be down approximately 2 degrees from being exactly in line with the driveshaft.  That way the driveshaft and pinion are straight in line when the pinion rotates up under power. The 2 u-joints in the CV joint stay at equal but opposite angles throughout its range of motion so vibration is always cancelled out.
 

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Elwenil said:
A U-joint can run with no angle with no problems
When there is no relative angle, the same exact needle bearings continue to get impacted. With slight angle they are forced to rotate and provide fresh surface, even wear.
 

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so as i thought the ideal angle for a u joint is as little as possible just not zero. going to look up the driveshaft manuals on danas website as mentioned
 

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s ǝoɾ said:
When there is no relative angle, the same exact needle bearings continue to get impacted. With slight angle they are forced to rotate and provide fresh surface, even wear.
That's true and might be an issue for something like a PTO shaft or something but with the suspension cycling all the time, I doubt it would ever be an issue on a vehicle. In any case it's always made me wonder why in the hell Dodge didn't have the front D44 built with more pinion angle to take advantage of the CV driveshft up front. Perhaps it would starve the pinion bearings for oil?
 

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Also correct, it applies more to "static" shafts like those found on the front of IFS vehicles, intermediate shafts, or multipiece driveshafts.

None of which technically applies to most ramchargers.

That said, there is not usually much suspension cycling when first placing your truck into reverse unless you/passenger are rather big. ;D

On the note of pinion bearing lube, it would not have been difficult or expensive for dana to pressure lube them like the np/nv aluminum transfer cases are.
 
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