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1978 W200
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is the right place to ask, but of course my plan was to pull a camper with the truck at some point. GVWR on the tag says 8000. Found a potential camper that should be about 3193lbs, and 21 feet. Anyone with experience think I'd have trouble with that with my truck? Probably would be some stuff in the bed, too. If it's borderline, I'd rather be safer and just live with a shorter camper. I'm also inexperienced with towing, just to add to the fun.
 

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You would watch your GVWR carefully when the camper sits IN your pickup bed.

All you need to consider for a trailer against the truck GVWR is the tongue weight. Its probably 500-1000#.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That makes sense, now that I imagine it. Ok. Thanks!
 

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The GVRW, is the maximum weight that can be carried on your trucks wheels. That does not include what is towed, only the actual weight the tongue adds to your truck.

Somewhere around here, we have some charts with the factory tow ratings for 77.

The factory tow package, included increased cooling, which i think was just a fan clutch. Sometimes a transmission cooler, and some times a bigger alternator.

I have towed over 7000 lbs with all my trucks, except for thr RC, which has done about 5000. They all do fine, except for the M887, which with the welder, sits close to 9000 to begin with (also only has a 318 for now).

With a good weight distributing reciever hitch (truck end class 4), and trailer brakes, you should easily be bale to tow 5000. More, and I would like to see an extra trans cooler.

In the US, generally trailers are setup for 10% of the weight on the hitch. So at 3193 dry, add a fem more hundred for water, and supplies, so say 3500, you will likely have about 350 lbs on the hitch (going towards your GVRW limit). With that, You are just touching if you really need a weight distributing hitch for the trailer. If it comes with one good, you do not need to have it adjusted much. If it does not, I think you would still be fine. Just measure how much the rear bumper drops when you hook it up. More then 4 inches or so I would definitely look at a WD hitch. No way to give any real numbers, as it depends on the condition of your springs.

Some step bumpers are rated for 500 lbs tounge weight, and 5000 lbs total trailer. I have exceeded that, but not comfortable doing it. I prefer a good WD receiver hitch. If you intend to use your step bumper, look for a weight rating, usually stamped by the ball mount. If not stamped, I would assume 300, and 3000 lbs total trailer.

Remember, we like pictures. ;)
 
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1978 W200
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Meh. Someone swooped in and got it ahead of me.


But now I have notes.
 

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Cooling, braking, lighting & visibility (mirrors) are other areas to consider in addition to pulling/handling the load.

Bucky
 

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1978 W200
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cooling, braking, lighting & visibility (mirrors) are other areas to consider in addition to pulling/handling the load.

Bucky
Like transimission cooler, brake booster, maybe trailer brakes? Got pretty decent mirrors. Still have my steering issue, so I'm probably looking at borrowing a truck to get a camper back. I'd hate to lose them both in one trip.
 
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