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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have experience with a carbureted magnum during winter months.  A mechanic informed me I would have icing trouble during winter months using a carbureted magnum due to lack of exhaust heat under the carb.  My rc primary use is snow plowing. I live in north ID and plow a lot of snow. Thanks
 

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I never had any trouble with it.  Granted, it didn't run worth a damn until it got warmed up, but that is pretty normal for a performance engine with a 750 double pumper in the winter.
 

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I had carb icing once- in a blizzard driving on I95 at 45 mph constantly.  Temps about 27 F with very high humidity.  I suspect you would be OK plowing b/c of the low speeds- both vehicle and engine speeds.

That said, a manifold heat stove being fabbed would help, as would a single snorkle air cleaner
 

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Many folks run air gap manifolds, which do not have the crossover.
Even more, run headers which do not have the heat riser valve, which cut out most of the exhaust going through the intake.
Many if not the majority of the older engines have the crossover blocked with carbon, and do not work.
And 99.99 % of them never have, or realize they have carb icing.

All that being said, for slow speed work like plowing, one could just not have the tube for the aircleaner that collects air from the outside of the engine compartment. Or make sure the heated air duct is working.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’ve got a heat stove connected to the air cleaner and all the valves on the cleaner work properly. Engine is a mag 360 with a edelbrock performer intake. It’s not an air gap type. I had the heads drilled for the la pattern. Qjet carb. I have no idea why the hell this popped into my brain in July but my mechanic mentioned the icing issue without exhaust crossover so I thought I would ask. The amount of snow it moves from dec to March is impressive and I don’t want issues like this if they can be prevented. Thanks
 

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you could always hook up something like an electric battery or pipe warmers on the spots that don't have linkage if you're worried about it.
 

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if you are that worried you could remove the mechanical fan and install electric fans. i run a 180*thermostat and even when i had electric fans they would allow the engine to get up to 220* before kicking on. engine/carb warms up and stays that way pretty good with the electric fans or you just wait a few minutes and things would thaw out
 

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I put an eddy on a eddy raised manifold , WAS worried also ( 25 30F below here winters ) it has NOT been a problem .  And FYI if it ever IS for ya .... when a carb ices , the motor is well on its way to warmed up , shut key off , sit for a few minuets ( hood closed ) , restart , and I'm betting it don't happen again .

mine has NO heated intake into the air filter either ( the hose from the exhaust manifold tin cover  to a/f snorkel )
 

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I have never heard of any specific case of carb icing on a car. or truck. Motorcycles, that have the carb open to the air, and of course aircraft that fly in the colder altitudes, yes. I could potentially see it happening on an engine that has the ductwork, to draw the air from the outside,

I think many of you have a misconception of when carb icing occurs. The prime time for icing, is cool summer evenings, & nights, with high humidity. As the temp approaches freezing, the moisture gets driven out, and you have less chance of icing. If you remember from school, dew forms when the moisture is driven out of the air due to the temp drop, and higher humidity. Thats what happens when the carb ices up. The temp drop inside the carb, is enough to force the moisture out of the air, and it collects inside the venturi, first as frost, then ice.
 

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If you have a working heated air system for your carburetor, I think it would be very unlikely that you would have any carburetor icing issues. I would also make sure that the manifold heat control (heat riser) system is working properly, as this will help your engine run better (vaporize any fuel that puddles on the intake manifold floor) and last longer (reduce gasoline dilution of engine oil). See Intake Manifold Heat.

Especially since you're using your RC in the winter, I would use the 195° thermostat. Modern ethanol fuels have components with very low boiling points, especially with winter blends. It is better to have a hot intake manifold and a cool carburetor so, if you have the room, adding 4-hole insulating spacer would give you better low-RPM operation. See Vapor Lock.
 

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I would think the icing problem would be more likely to start or happen in the fuel lines closer to the tank. Condensation in the tank is also a contributing factor for icing. I would think in your part of the country every store, gas station, and fast food restaurant would sell de-ice to add to the tank. Aircraft fuel has de-icing additives added to it.Simple solution, no mods necessary. Hell, I bet Jack Daniels would even work.
 

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gas line freezing , carb icing are 2 different things , the venturie effect causes moisture in the air to freeze in/on the carb .
 
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