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Correct, being a military course, we did not do much but brush over additives. We also trained on structures, like bridges and buildings, not on ground slabs. I cannot even say when the last time I saw a concrete project from the start was.
 

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I think modern concrete has gotten better. I used to work at a Gypsum mill and we were making a product that was put into concrete. Very slow curing stuff, but super strong, even early in the curing process. It allowed for traffic in something like 6 hours. You could literally shut down a bridge at 7pm, grind off the surface, lay this stuff down, and have the bridge open by 7am.

Now, that is an exceptional product and surely isn't in my pad. But it goes to show that additives can change the strength and curing properties immensely.
They do that a lot here in Washington. Our interstate 5 is made with concrete blocks poured in place. They will tear one of those out, pour it, and by morning we are driving on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
The plumbers came back to dig the water line between the new shop and the house. They had a heck of a time.

Under the yard we found two concrete walls, about a foot thick each, spaced out maybe 8 or 10 feet. They tried to dig around but found the walls kept going so no choice but to drill the water line through. I felt bad for all the extra work they had to do

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In between these two walls was filled with concrete chunks, rocks, broken cinder blocks and other assorted rubble.

Our theory is that this was either the remains of an old storm shelter/root cellar or perhaps the remains of the basement of the house that previously sat on this site. Our house was built in 1940 but there was a much older and smaller house here before that, per the old boy that lives down the road.

Either way, it was a POS. Not really relevant to the construction of the shop but I thought it was interesting nonetheless. You never know what you are going to find down there.
 

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Looks like an Indian burial site, you are going to go to hell for messing with it. :unsure:

IDK, looks a bit close together for a foundation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
That's what I thought too but who knows.

One other possibility is it was an old septic tank. I kind of doubt it though since it Probably would have had a lid on it if it had been a septic tank.
 

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Looks kinda thick for a septic tank, but is about the right distance apart. You think they would just fill it with dirt not rubble. I could see the lid missing after they filled it in though.

Around here, it could be an old irrigation cannal. we have separate canals/ tunnels/ pipes that carry untreated water for irrigating the yards.
 

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Either way, it was a POS. Not really relevant to the construction of the shop but I thought it was interesting nonetheless. You never know what you are going to find down there.
Hey, it's all part of the process. Clearly the only thing to be done now is keep digging it up until ya figure out what it was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Lol. No way man.

The pex was laid and the hole filled in.

Im over it 😁
 

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Maybe the concrete rubble WAS the lid
 

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Goog call. Curiosity usually cost a lot ;)
But whats the fun in that? Think of the education we are all loosing out on.
 

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I'm with the "Cover it up fast and don't let the govt or archeologists know you were there" crowd.
 
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But whats the fun in that? Think of the education we are all loosing out on.
The stories you uncover will most likely die with the diggers. I like getting to the truth but not waste money. Based on the dimensions of the foundations it present no historical value to the owners, IMO.

On the other hand it can be fun... :)
 

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The plumbers came back to dig the water line between the new shop and the house. They had a heck of a time.

Under the yard we found two concrete walls, about a foot thick each, spaced out maybe 8 or 10 feet. They tried to dig around but found the walls kept going so no choice but to drill the water line through. I felt bad for all the extra work they had to do





In between these two walls was filled with concrete chunks, rocks, broken cinder blocks and other assorted rubble.

Our theory is that this was either the remains of an old storm shelter/root cellar or perhaps the remains of the basement of the house that previously sat on this site. Our house was built in 1940 but there was a much older and smaller house here before that, per the old boy that lives down the road.

Either way, it was a POS. Not really relevant to the construction of the shop but I thought it was interesting nonetheless. You never know what you are going to find down there.
I get mystery jobs a lot.
I try to bid high enough in case of those mysteries. Then lose the job because I'm too high. I'd rather sit home and play video games than work for free.
Tip them appropriately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
I get mystery jobs a lot.
I try to bid high enough in case of those mysteries. Then lose the job because I'm too high. I'd rather sit home and play video games than work for free.
Tip them appropriately.
They each went home with a sixer
 

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Discussion Starter · #117 ·
The stories you uncover will most likely die with the diggers. I like getting to the truth but not waste money. Based on the dimensions of the foundations it present no historical value to the owners, IMO.

On the other hand it can be fun... :)
Just to drive home this point......Nobody lived on this plot of land until the 1890s, that I'm aware of. Anything built here would be fairly modern. Other than the 1938 barn, there isn't much here I'm attached to, let alone stuff that's buried here.

Contrast that with where you live. Everywhere you sink a shovel in Europe you pull up something interesting.

My neighbors did tell me the previous owner buried a Pontiac Bonneville somewhere out here, but they can't remember where.
 

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My neighbors did tell me the previous owner buried a Pontiac Bonneville somewhere out here, but they can't remember where.
Many moons ago, I helped a friend bury an old school bus on his property. I know there is many trees in the general area now, but I do wonder how it fared.
 

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Many moons ago, I helped a friend bury an old school bus on his property. I know there is many trees in the general area now, but I do wonder how it fared.
Sounds like a great tornado shelter
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
Seems like scrapping a bus would make more fiscal sense than burying it
 
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