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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that boxing in the frame makes it more rigid and doesn't allow it to flex so much. Is this a good or bad thing? What are the pros and cons of doing this to an old RC or TD? Is it better to box the whole frame, just particular areas, or leave it alone?
 

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Personaly I say don't weld it. There are a number of reasons why.

First of all the steel has a heat treating, but welding on it you remove the heat treating (in that area). So even though there is more steel there there is a good chance that it is weakened by the welding.

Second yes it will make it more rigid. This is good for high speed cornering, but is bad for offroad as it doesn't allow your frame to twist. The more flex you have off road the better it helps to keep your tires planted. True the frame isn't going to flex alot, and could be made up for fairly easy, but why do it in the first place?

Another argument for not doing it. The frames are plenty strong. Unless you are extreme hardcore I doubt you will ever crack your frame. The only place you might is the front drivers frame rail, and this usualy only happens when you've done cross over steering. So box that section if you have, but leave the rest alone
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool, thanks alot for your input.
 

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I boxed mine. The FSM says nothing about the frames being hardened. It does in fact say that you can weld them. I boxed mine from the front crossmember to the shock mount crossmember and I reinforced the steering box mount, and welded all of the crossmembers solid as well as the spring perches. Needless to say, I took a ton of flex out of my frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My main concern is the frame flexing with a rollcage installed that is tied into the frame through the body. If the frame and body flex too much, won't the cage weaken or break apart? Other than boxing in the frame, are there other alternatives to keep the cage from weakening? Or will the cage be strong enough on its own to hold together?
 

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loosewheelbob said:
My main concern is the frame flexing with a rollcage installed that is tied into the frame through the body. If the frame and body flex too much, won't the cage weaken or break apart? Other than boxing in the frame, are there other alternatives to keep the cage from weakening? Or will the cage be strong enough on its own to hold together?
There are two ways you can approach building a roll cage.

A Stock car uses a full roll cage & chassis which basically forms a box. This box cannot flex, so it should not crack. The downside to this form of cage is you need to first build a cage and then attach the body to the outside, as it's extremely difficult to build such a cage into an existing body.

The other way to approach building a roll cage, is to allow for flex. Some desert race trucks were known to use flexable supports & bushings. This requires a good understanding of how the chassis moves and some engineering to accomplish, but it's entirely possible to build a roll cage that will flex.

Ed
 

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I think the hardened steel frame thing is a myth. I'm into building lo-lo trucks and to get the trucks to drag frame you have to do a lot of frame mods including notching the frame rails. If you know what you're doing with a welder you have nothing to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Sam, thats what I was wondering. I was just worried that the cage may get twisted up because of the frame flexing. Now all I need is a place to work, a pipe bender, and a welder ;D
 

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There is no such thing as a "hardened" frame. The light duty frames (up to 1 tons) have a frame made of a carbon steel. The medium duty trucks (above 1 tons) have an alloy steel frame.
Heavy duty trucks have an alloy steel frame which is heat treated (not hardened).
Carbon steel frames can be welded.
Alloy steel frames can be welded.
Alloy steel heat treated frame cannot be welded.
Only consideration: alloy steel is very difficult to weld when the strenght is an important issue. Welding a cable guide to the frame is no problem. Welding a suspension component is a bigger issue; this part will put a lot of stress to the weld which, in turn, must be of an excellent quality.
Alloy steel needs special preparation and special welding material to be welded properly.
Carbon steel can be welded with normal preparation and welding material.

When welding is required to any frame part, the factory advises to use a "electrical welding equipment to limit the area which will be affected by the heat. And thus preventing to weaken the frame". Allso, when heat is necessary (for straightening of the frame): keep the temp below 1050F; this will give a dull red glow to the material.

That about welding...
 

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moparPW200guy said:
a little... enough that when you got hit nothing happened ;D
LOL, glad he didn't hit my bumper though. The mount it bent and the mounting point on the frame is bowed in somewhat. I think I wanna get it checked at the frame shop. That will determine if I restore it or make it my beater. Hopefully, the frame's not bent, just tweaked right there. :-[
 
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