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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well i am done with this dead end job life style and going to school to be a welder i think ....i love the automotive and diesel trades but i cant stand working on someone elses junk for a living ..but i like making stuff and getting dirty ...and i can read blue prints already ....old man is a journeyman machinist he taught me alot ... but curious to know what i am getting myself into and what other peoples experiences are with being in the  welding trades is like .... thanks

brian
 

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I don;t weld for a living BUT I had seen and done my fair share.

It all depends on what kind of welding you are getting into.

Fabrication of specialty things would be cool I think.
Assembly line stuff not so cool.
Pipe welding is good but lots of traveling.
If you don't mind heights building structure welding would be cool too but there is a lot of travel with that too.

I'm getting into rebuilding wrecked 18 wheeler trailers, welding involved too. Alum, steel, all mig from what I've been told and seen.
 

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My brother in law who I've known for a LONG time is a welder for a living and went to school for pipe, structural etc. you name it. He is a great welder and enjoys welding a lot, as do I. As much as he loves welding he figured out that he does NOT want to do it the rest of his life. He's mainly done routine welding where he's constantly welding the same stuff though. And he's had almost a dozen or so jobs in the last year, so being licensed to weld is not going to be guaranteeing you a job I'm afraid. If you could find a job in a fab shop and like welding you will be set. Hope this helps. Ask me anything else you want to know about what he does.
 

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My uncle is a welder of over 40 years. He loves it. Hes eligible for retirement, but keeps putting it off. "maby next year".  He repairs great lakes freighters and sometimes fabs parts for the railroad. Workin for the same company since he graduated HS.  Dont know how much money he makes, but enough to have a modest but nice house to raise a family in (single income) and have a vacation every year, drive a late model truck and have a few toys.

 

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This thread has kind of swerved in to a hot button issue now a days.  The importance of having a TRADE.
Read a study that when economic downturns happen, the first people to get the boot are sales related. 
Because they have no REAL skill working with their hands, they talk for a living.  (talk is cheap)
Many people think they are too good to get their hands dirty.  BUT, it is the backbone of our economy! 
EVEN if one later decides to go into a management, or whatever.  You always have a concrete skill to fall back on when times are rough. 
When I was in high school I went to 'trade school' to learn electronics.  Most people's attitude was that trade school is for losers.  But no matter what I did I had a skill set to fall back on. 
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you are so right todd and i failed to see it till way later in life and now i want to have that skill figure better late then never and i am not paying for school ...the national guard is lol ... appreciate the insight ...just wanted a kind of inside perspective is all ...but keep it coming ... i am a blue collar worker always have been i am a good talker but hey i like my hands dirty to much to do the talking that much lol ...
 

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ramchargertodd said:
This thread has kind of swerved in to a hot button issue now a days. The importance of having a TRADE.
Read a study that when economic downturns happen, the first people to get the boot are sales related.
Because they have no REAL skill working with their hands, they talk for a living. (talk is cheap)
Many people think they are too good to get their hands dirty. BUT, it is the backbone of our economy!
EVEN if one later decides to go into a management, or whatever. You always have a concrete skill to fall back on when times are rough.
When I was in high school I went to 'trade school' to learn electronics. Most people's attitude was that trade school is for losers. But no matter what I did I had a skill set to fall back on.
I kind of disagree. Look around you. The blue collar guy is the first to get a boot, because he is so easily replaced with someone else who will work for half price.

Don't believe me? Factory workers, auto mechanics, construction workers, welders, amongst others have been greatly outsourced or under cut.

There were a LOT of sales openings in recent times, because fresh sales are what drives profits for many companies, while they view blue collar, especially maintenance/repair as a bleeding cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
but the irony is there are very few people left around anymore that can do the maintenance on machines and industrial eqiupment and machinery ....i see it all over the classifieds and god would i kill to be an apprentice to learn from a guy who has been on the job for 20 years ...but companies are so unwilling to groom new people all they want is somebody who can do the job and their just isnt alot of people around that can anymore ...my dad is one of those people he did a job that ony 10 other people in a plant of a few thousand could do ....he retired and so 4 others ...they have yet to replace any of them ....2 years later ...ironic isnt it ....even my dad told them to hiresome people withthe basic know how and let them groom them to do their jobs but they wouldnt do it ....see my point is ...a little investment on the companies part can pay off ....but thats just not how its done now adays and its sad
 

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A lot of fields intentionally set unobtainable standards for employment so they can demonstrate to the government and public that their are no qualified AND affordable candidates within the US......thus justifying outsourcing.

"see. We tried to offer jobs to the american public first. there were no qualified candidates willing to apply. As you can see, it will be necessary to move operations off shore in order to remain feasible."

Of course if you read the hiring ad, it states "30 years of relative experience in some very specific niche role, doctorates degree, no mention of pay" If you inquire, you find they will offer $11/hr.

A lot of that is happening in the tech sector right now.
 

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I'm an apprentice welder with almost 1000 hours.I enjoy it a lot but ill tell you it is not clean work.The gases and dust you inhale is dam near as worse as cigarettes.Couple people I work with have some serious joint issues.But a lot depends on the shop you work in and what they build.My shop builds oil rigs and almost everything is heavy steal (1inch+ steel) and just moving this stuff around plays hell on your body.We have cranes but quite often objects are to awkward or the crane cant reach them.I enjoy my shop because I'm always doing different things never building the exact same thing.There are shops however that work like an assembly line and you will be stuck with the same endless Sh*t.If your stick welding,Its just plain ass ugly work.If your MiG welding it isn't quite as bad as stick but still has its lows.Now Tig welding,Ive never done it myself but from what Ive heard it is very clean work and not extremely physical just more tedious.
I'm young so it don't much bother me  :p.
That my 2 cents
 

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I'm not a welder by trade even though I have  been certified .  I use to work in nuke plants and was certified by their instructor.and some of the work there gets x ray-ed. some times in not so clean or safe conditions.  I love welding but like a few others the jobs have taken their toll on my body. back problems .joint pain , and even had eyes flash burned once. You living in Ohio could get into the trades and make a very good income and with your machine shop experience is a plus as well. I have also worked in a electric motor shop rewinding motors and rebuilding welders and gen. fixed many of shafts.I guess the question is if its what you wanna do for your job,its a starting place and some thing you could use in many areas and always something to fall back on if you decide to change.
 

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DerangedMoose said:
and even had eyes flash burned once.
Yeh forgot to mention that, flashing your eyes is not fun stuff :eek:. Tack with your sheild down my freinds or at least put your hand over it.
 

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All I have to say is get as much training in as many areas as you can.

I've had to a trade because my body just wore out, floor coverings for one. After 15 years I was done doing it full time. I had backup though because of my construction background. That has dried up around here, so I'm now falling into a new career of welding fabrication, and other kinds of repairs that I have been doing most of my life.

Even if you don't do welding for a career it's good to have as a backup "just in case" you need it. {2cents}

Boons said:
Yeh forgot to mention that, flashing your eyes is not fun stuff :eek:. Tack with your sheild down my freinds or at least put your hand over it.
Or buy and auto-dark lid. :p
 

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if your thinking of school, go get an AA degree at least, something in the medical field, i am thinking about medical radiology however there is usually a waiting list.
 

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JackedRamcharger said:
if your thinking of school, go get an AA degree at least, something in the medical field, i am thinking about medical radiology however there is usually a waiting list.
My Wife is a nurse always can find work great field to get into..I on the other had do maintenance for apartment complex now and they just handed me another in the town over one complex has 64 units the other 70 have my hands full but job security.
 

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I had heard ticketed welders making 11-12.00/hour in the U.S.
hardly worth getting a ticket for that.my son pumps gas for 9.50 /hour.
welders up here on the pipelines are one of the highest paid trades.
as a licensed auto mechanic,i was earning 23/hour but drove 50 miles to work every day.
now i work for parks as a mechanic/welder.love the welding part,seems there's always something to build or fix.mechanical side is mowers,atv's and other maintenance equipment.
heavy equipment operators,electricians,plumbers and telephone technicians would all make better money,less backbreaking work.
 
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