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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been doing searches on the internet but so far I havent found anything helpful. Ive contacted Edelbrock but it may be awhile so I thought Id ask here in the meantime. I have recently moved from 500 ft elevation to 3300 ft. I have an Edelbrock 1412 carburetor that was on my 68 Coronet. I took it off today cus the car is running REALLY rich and fouling plugs. It ran OK at the lower elevation but probably could have run better. I bought this carb used years ago and put it on the car without rebuilding it. I disassembled it today and took out all four jets but Im unable to read any of the numbers so I don't know if it was still the factory setup or not. I can tell it's been apart before though so they may have been changed . Im told I need to go down two sizes on the jets (from factory) but since I cant read the numbers and have no starting point I dont know what jets I need to order for my elevation. Also I want to know if I need to change the rods.
Any help would be appreciated.
 

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What size engine do you have? An 800 cfm carb is a big carb, especially for high elevation and especially for a mostly stock engine. The jet and rod size (because yes, you must change the rod size and springs also) is: 113 primary metering jets, 107 secondary metering jets, 0. 071 x 0. 047 metering rods and step-up spring (5 Hg).
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
What size engine do you have? An 800 cfm carb is a big carb, especially for high elevation and especially for a mostly stock engine. The jet and rod size (because yes, you must change the rod size and springs also) is: 113 primary metering jets, 107 secondary metering jets, 0. 071 x 0. 047 metering rods and step-up spring (5 Hg).
As I said, it has a 440. It is far from stock. It was built as a street legal drag car to run on pump gas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What size engine do you have? An 800 cfm carb is a big carb, especially for high elevation and especially for a mostly stock engine. The jet and rod size (because yes, you must change the rod size and springs also) is: 113 primary metering jets, 107 secondary metering jets, 0. 071 x 0. 047 metering rods and step-up spring (5 Hg).
So those numbers for the jets you list, are those sizes?, or part numbers? Also, are you saying that's what I need to get? Or that's what it would have come with from the factory? Sorry, Ive rebuilt carbs before but Ive never had to mess with jets or rods so Im new to this part.
 

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I recommend you get a tuning kit instead of trying to guess what rods and jets will work best, it's more expensive but a lot less aggravating overall.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK,
I recommend you get a tuning kit instead of trying to guess what rods and jets will work best, it's more expensive but a lot less aggravating overall.

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Yes, I realize that. But first I need to know if the kit will have what I need. I wasnt trying to guess anything. Just buying the kit isnt gonna help me if I dont know what's in the carb now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK, I have since been able to make out a number on the jets that are towards the rear of the carb, Im assuming those are the secondaries? The number is 120-401 which according to Edelbrock is .101.
 

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That's the stock secondary jet size for a 1412, I'd imagine the primaries are stock as well but there's no telling if it's been into before.
 

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So those numbers for the jets you list, are those sizes?, or part numbers? Also, are you saying that's what I need to get? Or that's what it would have come with from the factory? Sorry, Ive rebuilt carbs before but Ive never had to mess with jets or rods so Im new to this part.
Sorry, I overlooked the engine size in the title. Those numbers I gave you are the jet sizes for an out of the box 800 cfm Edelbrock carburetor.

Performer Carburetor #1412 800 CFM With Manual Choke, Satin Finish (Non-EGR)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's the stock secondary jet size for a 1412, I'd imagine the primaries are stock as well but there's no telling if it's been into before.
Sorry, I overlooked the engine size in the title. Those numbers I gave you are the jet sizes for an out of the box 800 cfm Edelbrock carburetor.

Performer Carburetor #1412 800 CFM With Manual Choke, Satin Finish (Non-EGR)
OK cool. I guess I should have looked for the specs on Edelbrock's website but I didnt think they'd show jet sizes. Im trying real hard to make out the number on the primaries but they are kinda chewed up. At least now I know what it should have had when it was new. Are carbs normally set up for around sea level from the factory?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Jet sizes. So jet sizes correspond to the size of number drill bits. We are all familiar with fractional drill bits, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 etc. but there are also letter dills A to Z, and number drills. So if you have a #72 jet it is the same as a #72 drill, etc. if you need a larger jet just drill it two sizes larger, in this example a #74. Smaller jet? Solder it up solid and drill it with a #70 bit. This also goes for propane appliances. Costs nothing but time.

Btw, number drill bits do not correlate to thousandths of an inch鈥 so a #72 bit is not .072 thou. FYI.

If you have a jet in an unknown size you can just use numbered bits to find the size, then adjust accordingly.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Jet sizes. So jet sizes correspond to the size of number drill bits. We are all familiar with fractional drill bits, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 etc. but there are also letter dills A to Z, and number drills. So if you have a #72 jet it is the same as a #72 drill, etc. if you need a larger jet just drill it two sizes larger, in this example a #74. Smaller jet? Solder it up solid and drill it with a #70 bit. This also goes for propane appliances. Costs nothing but time.

Btw, number drill bits do not correlate to thousandths of an inch鈥 so a #72 bit is not .072 thou. FYI.

If you have a jet in an unknown size you can just use numbered bits to find the size, then adjust accordingly.

Thanks, but I don't want to reuse the jets. I figured out what size they are and they are kind of chewed up so I want to just replace them. Besides, the Edelbrock jets are not numbered that way.
 

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May I suggest an O2 sensor and stop guessing.
I have a 800 AVS thunder on my 505, and setup the 3 level wilth the O2, Idle (15), part throttle (14.5) and WOT (13.5).
work like a charm.
 
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