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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't answer that yet, I'm not done. :p

I was just speaking over the phone, and they were calling me to see if I would be interested in working with the EPA to figure out more ways to saddle diesel engines with emissions equipment.  :-X No exaggeration, the EPA wants researchers to test various methods of tightening the emission systems on on/off road diesels.

Is THAT hypocritical of me for not hanging up on them? Is it bad to make a deal with the "devil"? LMAO.
 
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No, I think that is a wonderful opportunity learn from some other bright minds and to make a difference in the world. If you can help make them cleaner and keep the performance that is a win for everyone.
 

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gmule said:
No, I think that is a wonderful opportunity learn from some other bright minds and to make a difference in the world. If you can help make them cleaner and keep the performance that is a win for everyone.
{agree}
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
KThaxton said:
Will you be divvying test vehicles to your peers.....buddy? :p
I have a strong feeling these are engines on a stand in some kind of clinical setting.

I also have a feeling that pay would likely not be anything extremely impressive, keeping in mind the fact I have yet to finish a degree, and that is pretty much a prerequisite for $ around here.

I guess it might be cool, a chance to learn new things.

I scheduled an appointment, not much harm in seeing what they have to say. Guess I will have to bite my tongue on my opinions of the EPA, and deny ever knowing superburban and pwp. ;D {gloating}

I forgot to mention, a lot of the testing is also to retrofit currently existing vehicles with more scrubbers. Is that evil?

We are a center of comprehensive research, development and testing of advanced powertrain and emission aftertreatment technologies for local, state and federal governments as well as the fuels, engine and aftertreatment industries.

This center is staffed with engineers and researchers from the University of Houston Departments of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. The center has research capabilities spanning bench scale testing of emerging technologies to full scale testing of heavy duty diesel vehicles. The main components of the facility are a 500hp AC chassis dynamometer test cell, a 600 hp AC engine dynamometer test cell, a portable emissions measurement system, and a comprehensive research laboratory. The main focus of the testing activities is on retrofit technologies to decrease NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions from on-road and off-road vehicles and equipment. The research activities focus on the reaction engineering of advanced catalytic aftertreatment technologies, synthetic fuels and additives, and biofuels in terms of emissions, fuel economy and sustainability.

We perform the following services:
Pre-verification testing
Technology screening
Optimization of technologies
Fundamental and applied research
Concept development
Technology demonstrations


Chassis
The 500hp AC chassis dynamometer test cell, of which there are only a handful of in the United States, gives us the capability to drive vehicles under controlled conditions while simultaneously measuring the emissions and fuel economy. In this way we are able to test emission reduction devices as well as various fuels (such as biodiesel) and determine what impact they have on emissions. The chassis dynamometer is ideal for testing hybrid vehicles that cannot be tested on an engine dynamometer.

Engine
The 600hp AC engine dynamometer test cell gives us the capability to mimic the testing that is done in EPA labs on heavy duty engines. The test cell allows us to run tests in accordance with the code of federal regulations. We are able to perform tests on various new and older diesel engines in order to determine the engine emissions under very controlled conditions. Emissions from the engine cell can be measured either raw or dilute, using a wide variety of emissions analyzers for gases and particulates.

Portable
The portable emissions measurement system allows us to measure actual vehicle emissions in situ. We are able to measure the gaseous as well as the particulate matter emissions while the tested vehcile is working under normal conditions. The portable emissions system is equipped with a GPS tracking system, which enables us to measure actual emissions that the vehicle is emitting in space and time. This system is useful for determining how newer technologies, which are under develplment, operate when taken out of the laboratory environment and are used in the real world.

Lab
The research laboratory includes bench-scale reactor and fuel combustion systems, particulate speciation analysis, and gas and liquid characterization analyzers. The bench scale reactor system evaluates catalysts and reactors using synthetic and actual diesel exhaust. Mechanistic, kinetic and performance studies of a variety of reaction systems are carried out, including fuel reforming, NOx storage and reduction, selective catalytic reduction, and their combinations. The fuel combustion test stand is used for screening of new fuels, fuel blends and additives. The system can rapidly test the emission features of any fuel of interest. Research is being carried out on biofuel synthesis, characterization and combustion, including biodiesel and algae-derived fuels.
 
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500hp AC chassis dynamometer test cell, a 600 hp AC engine dynamometer test cell, a portable emissions measurement system, and a comprehensive research laboratory.
That seems worth the price of admission to play with those toys.
 

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No, you're not a hypocrite, and yes, this sounds like a cool opportunity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This position will consist of working with diesel engines and installing and testing engine exhaust after treatment devices. The ideal candidate will have hands on experience with diesel engine electronics and exhaust piping. Experience with dynamometers and emissions analyzers is desirable. This is a hands on position. This position will involve some travel.
Minimum Qualifications: Experience with diesel engine electronics is required. Experience with exhaust pipe work (welding and bending), engine sensors, and diesel exhaust treatment is desired.
Welding, dynamometers, gas analyzers, and diesel is on my resume. Gonna have to brush up and take a crash course in what a sensor/engine electronics does though.
 

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Go to work for them. If you can help develop an emissions system efficient enough that trucks can get rid of the additive tank full of piss I'll consider it a win.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hard_runner67 said:
Go to work for them. If you can help develop an emissions system efficient enough that trucks can get rid of the additive tank full of piss I'll consider it a win.
Real pickup trucks don't have urea. (cough cough dodge) I know that excludes medium/heavy duty market, just taking a cheap shot at ford and gm.
 

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s ǝoɾ said:
Real pickup trucks don't have urea. (cough cough dodge) I know that excludes medium/heavy duty market, just taking a cheap shot at ford and gm.
Yeah but I've heard through the grapevine that the 6.7's are having turbo problems from having that big honking EGR system required to et it emissions legal. Dunno how true that is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hard_runner67 said:
Yeah but I've heard through the grapevine that the 6.7's are having turbo problems from having that big honking EGR system required to et it emissions legal. Dunno how true that is.
I think that was more towards the last time you took sabbatical from the site.
 

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s ǝoɾ said:
I think that was more towards the last time you took sabbatical from the site.
Am I out of the loop that bad? Geez, buddy b.sing tech is farther behind than I thought...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hard_runner67 said:
Am I out of the loop that bad? Geez, buddy b.sing tech is farther behind than I thought...
Somewhere in the 07-08 time frame.

http://ramchargercentral.com/diesel-talk/6-7-l-lawsuits/

Don't try to keep up with cummins. Like I said before, they slap something new together every 5 years and play it by ear. It gets figured out just about in time for the next new one to hit the scene. No time for research. You'd go crazy if you tried to track this stuff, better off with airplanes where they aren't allowed to just throw something and hope it flies. ;D
 

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s ǝoɾ said:
Somewhere in the 07-08 time frame.

http://ramchargercentral.com/diesel-talk/6-7-l-lawsuits/

Don't try to keep up with cummins. Like I said before, they slap something new together every 5 years and play it by ear. It gets figured out just about in time for the next new one to hit the scene. No time for research. You'd go crazy if you tried to track this stuff, better off with airplanes where they aren't allowed to just throw something and hope it flies. ;D
Yeah we're still using the same VW engines and John Deere tractor ignition system that they were using 60 years ago. Progress thy name is aviation ::).

I do try to keep up with Cummins. I seem to get drafted into working on them. A buddy of mines injection pump is going out on his 24 valve. I believe a P-pump conversion is on the horizon. I can't wait 9-10 years when I get to tinkering with the 6.7 to see what kind of real power they are capable of...
 

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I think this would be a great oppertunity.  I see the issues we have with EGR and emissions with the buses and would love a better thought out system rather than band-aid style fixes.  We spend more money due to these systems failing than we do with just about anything else.  It's the future, and you may be on the leading edge of it.  Good luck!
 

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I'm all for it, just so long as you don't come up with some kind of "add on" emissions system for our older critters  :p

My Diesel has No Emissions equipment whatsoever, from the factory, and i'd like to keep it that way  :p  The only thing it has is a Crankcase Breather, which i routed to an old (Coolant) Overflow Jug with a Vent and a Drain Valve to keep the stray oil vapors from building up in the engine compartment, or soaking my frame over time.

When it builds up a decent amount of oil, i can open the drain and collect it in a coffee can or something.. Then i can either burn it in the Oil Furnace in the garage, or dump it in the tank on the Diesel  :p

Although it hasn't built up any noticeable oil in the year or so i've had the "Breather Jug" on the truck, granted it hasn't been run much (In/Out of the garage to work on the truck)  Originally the Breather was routed right into the Air Tube between the Filter & Turbo  :-\  I didnt like the idea of oil building up on the inside of my Turbo.
 
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