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Unless you have the proper reclaiming equipment, I wouldn't even bother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm replacing the compressor due to a leak in the compressor. The freon is gone and the system empty.

I just need a tutorial on removing the belt, getting the compressor replaced, and flushing the system.
 

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***Random Hints***
  • Disconnect battery (don't even ask why. You will figure out soon enough when the screw driver slips and shorts a circuit)
  • Take pictures of any areas you will be disconnecting things from.
  • Remove compressor. There isn't an easy way to describe it, other than unbolt and remove
  • MAKE SURE not to spill any of the oil. THIS IS IMPORTANT. You are going to need to catch it into a glass measuring cup to measure how much was in the old compressor. Also allows a quick observation of possible particles.
  • INSTALL AN INLINE FILTER. This is basically mandatory unless you like to repeat this job. Black Death. Find filter Here
  • A new receiver-dryer is advisable
  • If you want reliable cooling, avoid installing the factory c171 compressor. The c171 is not suitable for r134a's higher head pressure, failure is common. The later sanden is required. It is not a direct bolt-in. It requires bouchillon bracket BPE4725 and Sanden BPE7312 compressor Line modifications may be required. v737d can clarify.
  • Replace all accessible o-rings with new r134a compatible ones while you can
  • Leave the recharging and vacuum to a reputable shop, they can address any flushing as seen fit.
  • have UV dye installed in the oil
  • You may be required to install an auxiliary electric cooling fan, trigger via relay and ac clutch wire. The stock condenser is not fully compatible with r134a, and may build high head pressure, requiring a fan to compensate. (or optional heavy duty condenser available for 1993 ramchargers, a parallel flow design.
  • make sure your engine cooling system and automatic transmission are not adding excess heat due to failing components. Either can create sub-par ac performance
  • clean you Suit case

Living in central texas leaves absolutely no room for cheaping out or taking any short cuts. If money really is an issue, might as well not even do the job, as opposed to doing a short cut, which will cost more $$$.
 

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The Bouchillon stuff is very very well engineered.  The Sanden bolts right up.  The high and low pressure line fittings to the compressor will need to be changed to modern o ring screw on type. 

Also highly highly recommend installing a modern parallel flow condenser.  Depending on what you find out there you will most likely also have to install new o ring screw on fittings for the condenser. 

What I ran into was the stock lines were going to be way to short after cutting off the old fittings and installing new ones.  I had to cheat and plumb in a high and low pressure ports to make the lines longer.  That would have worked but I had bought a generic condenser and one of the fitting was down at the bottom (not both at the top like your stock one).  I ended up scrapping the entire stock line system with the exception of fitting that bolts up to the  expansion valve.  It was not fun finding a place here in tiny isolated Del Rio capable of doing the work properly. 

I probably ended up spending close to 250 just on the lines after all the start overs!

The sad part is the motor died shortly there after and I haven't had the chance to test it in super hot weather yet.


Bottom line, to do this properly you are going to spend close to 5 bills.  Don't try and evacuate the system yourself or flush it or fill it.  Let the pros do that.  You can check for leaks with a cheapo vacuum pump though.  I would also find a shop willing to do the flush/refill on your modified system before starting.  I went through six different places here before I found some guys willing to touch my system.  Most would not even look at it "too old" (even though all related parts were brand new including evap).  People around here evidently were getting their systems serviced and then were annoyed three months later when the 20 year old high pressure line cracked and started leaking.  Or at least that was the story I was given.  I suspect most of these guys thought I was under cover state inspector or something. 

90% of the state yearly inspection places here lost their licenses about 10 years ago for massive fraud and violations.  Wish I could have witnessed that.....


Cheers

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your help, everybody.

I started to change out the A/C compressor on Saturday but hit a roadblock. The rear bolts on the A/C compressor are blocked by a radiator hose and insanely difficult to access.

Since I don't feel like draining and refilling the cooling system, I may just take it to the shop. I found a guy who will put in the new compressor (with new receiver/dryer and orifice tube) & recharge the system for $250. Seems worth it since the slightest screw up on my side could ruin my new compressor.

What do yall think?
 

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The rear of the compressor is bolted to a small aluminum bracket that is in turn bolted to the engine.  Those bolts from the bracket to the engine are much easier to remove.  Take a look (with a flash light!)


Cheers

Chris
 
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